/r/Vermiculture

Photograph via snooOG

The place for worm discussion of all sorts. Whether you're raising worms for composting, bait, or God knows why else, this is the place for discussion. Common topics covered are setting up new worm bins, getting high-quality vermicompost, making vermicompost tea, or common problems encountered when raising worms.


The Vermiculture Reddit

Vermicompost is the product or process of composting using various worms, usually red wigglers, white worms, and other earthworms to create a heterogeneous mixture of decomposing vegetable or food waste, bedding materials, and vermicast. Vermicast, also called worm castings, worm humus or worm manure, is the end-product of the breakdown of organic matter by an earthworm. These castings have been shown to contain reduced levels of contaminants and a higher saturation of nutrients than do organic materials before vermicomposting.

Containing water-soluble nutrients, vermicompost is an excellent, nutrient-rich organic fertilizer and soil conditioner. This process of producing vermicompost is called vermicomposting.

Wikipedia: vermicompost

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/r/Vermiculture

40,086 Subscribers

1

Are my worms dead?

I just got these worms in the mail yesterday and I introduced them to the worm box immediately. 2 days later I go to check on them and I see that there’s a clump that has not moved when I poke at them or shine light on them they don’t react at all they just still. Are they dead?

0 Comments
2024/03/28
14:53 UTC

1

What do you price your castings for and in what region?

I am a USA East coast castings seller located near the capital. Over the last year of selling I typically price around 3-4$ per gallon. I thought this was reasonably fair and I always had buyers. What I found from my market research suggested this was about average, especially when compared to large box store bags of worm compost.

I just watched a Capitan Matt's worm farm video where he sells a 5 gallon bucket for 50$! And a singular pound for 20$ at the farmers market.

What do you guys sell for? Preferably those that do larger amounts of volume.

0 Comments
2024/03/28
13:55 UTC

0

Over a year since compostable bag test started with ENC worms

0 Comments
2024/03/28
13:01 UTC

6

Tis the season!

5 Comments
2024/03/28
12:45 UTC

3

Depth okey for ENC?

Just got this awesome box system for free and was hoping to use it for more worms. But the depth is only 12cm. Will it be alright for breeding ENC?

4 Comments
2024/03/28
12:36 UTC

3

Worms available in Thailand

Hi all! I just wanted to post a PSA about Tony from wormfarmthailand.com. I previously lived in the USA and did at home composting using Red Wrigglers (tiger worms), that I had purchased locally VIA a local non profit. After moving to Thailand, I wanted to continue the practice here, but was unsure of where to source the worms.

After ALOT of googling, I reached out to Tony VIA email and he responded quickly. The current rate he quoted me was 890 Baht per 200 worms, but added an extra "20" just in case. He asked that I send him the money via bank transfer to secure the appointment to pick up the worms, but I told him that I did not feel comfortable sending the entire cost without meeting him first. He accepted and asked for a 400 Baht deposit, and the rest during pick up and sent an email with a photo of said worms (with a tony water mark). We made an appointment, and when the meeting came he just scooped the worms from one box with alot of worms, to another for me to take home. It was not precise but honestly I didn't really care that much - I did not expect either of us to count out 200 worms and it felt like a fair amount (not stingy). It is an expensive rate, especially to what I had paid in NYC from the non profit (although its in the name, they weren't selling for a profit).

If you're looking to source composting worms in Thailand, Tony is your guy! He's been doing this for over 10 years and it was a great experience and the worms were healthy. He speaks both Thai and English. I am lucky enough to live close to where his location is, so I was able to drive and pick up but I do believe he will mail them at a different rate should you ask.

0 Comments
2024/03/28
06:45 UTC

3

Is there any reason why composting is more common than vermicomposting?

I am currently writing a business plan for a vermicomposting business for a university competition. If my plan is good, I can advance to pitching it to judges who can provide seed money to help start the business. It is something I'm passionate about, and would love to turn my hobby into something greater.

Throughout my research, I keep finding supporting data and research that shows how vermicomposting might be superior to regular, heat-based composting. For example, it is faster to do, finished fertilizer does not need to be cured, it can be done indoors, and worm casting has a higher nutrient content.

I cannot, however, find much information on why composting seems to be more common. Several states have public composting facilities and there are a lot more composting businesses than vermicomposting ones. With all the benefits vermicomposting seems to have, I am confused about why it is not as widespread.

Is there something I am not considering? The general cons for vermicomposting are notable, but there are a lot of ways to work around them.

Some common ones I found were worms need to be separated from finished material, worm populations need to be maintained, worms need stable conditions to process material effectively, and large quantities of waste might be difficult to process. A lot of these can be solved easily or with proper operations. For example, continuous-flow-through models make separation easy, regular composting conditions similarly have to be monitored for correct conditions, vermicomposting can be done indoors making it ideal for colder climates or urban areas, and you need to ensure you have the correct amount of worms to process a certain amount of material.

I want to make sure I am covering all my bases. Strangely, there are all these benefits, but it isn't as common. I do not feel comfortable chalking it up to a lack of education or the status quo as of now.

18 Comments
2024/03/28
03:58 UTC

0

I put 40 super worms in a small compost bin. What will happen long term?

A few weeks ago, I wanted to start a small vermicompost bin as an experiment. However, when I got to the pet store, they were out of red wrigglers. They did, however, have a bunch of superworms (Morios) in stock.

Now from what I’ve read, people say that superworms can’t be used in composters. This is because 1) they produce frass, not castings and 2) because morios don’t thrive in excessively moist areas like a compost bin. However, I was curious why that is. Superworms originate from tropical regions and eat decomposing organic matter. If that’s the case, why do people say they’re harmed by mold, moisture, heat? I wanted to put this to the test, so I bought 40 morios and added them to my small little compost container.

It has now been about 2 weeks, and the cardboard/ food waste in the bin has started to mold and rot. The superworms are, from what I can tell, all still alive. They appear healthy and active, although they mainly remain towards the bottom of the bin. I haven’t added any new material as there’s still a ton left, but I was wondering what will happen if I continue on this course? Will they eventually eat everything in there, leaving a pile of frass? Will they die off? They seem to be thriving so far.

Anyone have any experience doing something similar with superworms? Predictions on what will happen next?

32 Comments
2024/03/27
21:33 UTC

8

Feeling cute. Thought I’d take a selfie.

3 Comments
2024/03/27
21:30 UTC

2

Black Kow Bedding

8 Comments
2024/03/27
21:00 UTC

0

250-day European nightcrawler worm bins get melon & coffee

0 Comments
2024/03/27
13:05 UTC

11

“Just lay back and enjoy the ride”

15 Comments
2024/03/27
13:01 UTC

21

"Looks wet." It's not I swear! I haven't added water in weeks. I get this perfect, pillowy, granular size when the moisture has dropped enough In anticipation of harvesting, I use these small tubs to easily control variables like moisture, temp, airflow, turning, worm numbers, back pain.

22 Comments
2024/03/27
04:43 UTC

6

favorite worm foods?

Hey all, I have noticed that my worms seem to have a preference for some of the softer food scraps: old salad greens, mushy strawberries, brown bananas, etc. Are there any fruit/ veggie food scraps that worms cannot consume no matter how old and moldy? I have been adding the onions and citrus food scraps to my outdoor compost so I do not upset the pH of the worm bin.

Thanks!

27 Comments
2024/03/27
00:25 UTC

3

Seaweed for worms?

I'm curious if anyone has fed seaweed to worms before and how that worked out? I have some seaweed pills that are dried, powderized, then pressed into tablets seaweed of this particular species spirulina something. I have 2 giant jars, and I'm curious if I can give some to my worms. I also have dried seaweed, and I could buy fresh seaweed locally, so I'm curious if those can be eaten by worms too or if they're inherently too salty being from the sea and all?

4 Comments
2024/03/27
00:22 UTC

6

Coelomic fluid stress reaction. Sorry buddy.

8 Comments
2024/03/26
23:40 UTC

1

Rice bran for worms?

I got a few packs of organic brown rice bran for free, 1 sugar free, 2 sugar'd. I've never heard of rice bran, and WebMD says it's fiber for our guts, but no more than 30 grams per day. That's very little. So is rice bran safe to feed my worms if it turns out I don't like eating it myself?

And just by the way, anyone here like eating rice bran? It looks like very fine tan powder.

2 Comments
2024/03/26
21:40 UTC

3

The PP's of having a worm bin > Pest & Problems

Think, this will answer a lot of the repeated same type post Great read > awesome knowledge https://urbanwormcompany.com/mites-ants-bsfl-odor-fruit-flies-worm-bin-pests-problems/

3 Comments
2024/03/26
21:23 UTC

8

Acidity of spent coffee grounds

Hi guys. I see everywhere that if you feed your bin coffee grounds you should amend it with an alkaloid like ground eggshells, since coffee is acidic. I've been reading up on coffee and it seems that spent coffee grounds are between 6 and 7 on the PH scale, and worms like that level of acidity. So do I actually need to worry about my bin becoming too acidic because of coffee grounds?

30 Comments
2024/03/26
08:51 UTC

5

Please help identify species.

Got "red worms" for fishing bait, ended up starting a worm bin and started breeding. Not sure, but I'm thinking they might be European Night Crawlers.

6 Comments
2024/03/26
04:43 UTC

3

How many worms should a 70 gallon hdx tote be able to occupy?

Basically have a bunch of stuff to vermicompost and was gonna throw it all in a big container. How many worms should I put in this thing to make it go fast? I read 500 worms per cubic foot but im so bad at math. My estimations are 5000 worms.

Also, what combination of worm varieties would best break down myceliated grains from old substrate? Or does that not matter?

https://www.homedepot.com/p/HDX-70-Gal-Tough-Storage-Tote-

This is the tote in reference im thinking of getting.

Thank you for anyone who can give me an accurate idea without over crowding the worms.

8 Comments
2024/03/26
04:10 UTC

7

Escape help

Hey friends, I'm new here and have a new bin.

To get it started I've been giving them some work food as my kitchen scraps get working. The worms stay in my office at home so they don't get too warm outside.

My issue is how the heck do you keep them from escaping. I got a bin and there's vent holes at the top and a lid and they can crawl through it. And every time I lift the lid unless its right after I feed a bunch of the worm food there's a whole bunch of worms on the lid. Right now they're only not leaving the lid because I've been keeping a light on for them and they're staying under the cover of the lid.

Temperature is about 70, I can't do colder, I live in Houston. The humidity in there seems good, a couple drops when squeezed. And honestly there's usually only 10 or 15 at a time exploring the lid. I don't think it's an issue with the bin. Half cardboard, half buffered cocoa coir. Had it about a week.

Honestly I accidentally got into this. I wanted worms for my new raised garden. Got the dirt delivered and was over confident in my husbands schedule to get the dirt in the garden. So I ordered the worms and then had to get them a home. It's been a whole thing. Please don't judge, I'm doing my best and the worms seem happy unless it's been 6+ hours since I've fed them. IDK if I'm feeding enough because I don't want to over feed them. Theyve been getting kitchen scraps too, old yucky banana, apple core, tea bags, half a tortilla , strawberry ends, lettuce etc. No citrus. But they seem to really like the worm food.

I got some free night crawlers with the order and had a short bin with a clear lid and that seems to be working fine for them. No escapes from them. They're going straight in the garden as soon as the husband puts the rest of the yardage in. Just a ton of attempted escapes from the little red ones. I don't want to leave the light on indefinitely y'all. Please help.

12 Comments
2024/03/26
02:16 UTC

8

Kicked my worms into the garage

Migrated from a 3 bin system in the house.

Gonna need to likely rig a warming system when winter hits again. 50f right now because it’s still freezing at night.

2 Comments
2024/03/25
23:05 UTC

7

Using worms from cold compost pile to start a wormery?

Hello! I am aware this may seem weird/pointless but please bear with me...

I have a fairly low-maintenance, carbon-heavy cold compost pile going. It works for me - I live in an urban area, composting on a tiny balcony, so getting the mass and right ratio to get hot compost going is just way too much effort. It's also not worth it; I compost to send less stuff to landfill, and it's an interesting little hobby. I do use it for my houseplants and to grow some stuff on my balcony, but I don't need to maximise my compost output.

I was considering using worms and materials from an established pile to start a worm bin. It probably seems excessive but tbh it's more because I find invertebrates fascinating. Having usable compost faster is a nice perk, too.

I know you can buy them, but I don't want to for something so small-scale. I'd also rather use whatever is already in the local ecosystem instead of having some worms shipped to me from 200+ miles away.

So is this doable? My main worry is that maybe whatever species live in the compost piles may not do as well in a worm bin and I would feel awful if I accidentally killed them :(

5 Comments
2024/03/25
22:03 UTC

13

Worms having a good time

My ENCs a week after adding around 30 liters of water and top feeding. Looking a lot better with the added moisture.

0 Comments
2024/03/25
17:52 UTC

0

Going "topless" in the 292-day "original" red wiggler worm bins

0 Comments
2024/03/25
13:00 UTC

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