/r/homestead

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Ponds, barns, livestock, gardens, food preservation, fishing, hunting, tractors, pigs, chickens, cattle, worms, 4H, permaculture, organic, grazing, canning, aquaculture, trees, woodland, farmers, agriculture, agronomy, horticulture, wwoofers, bees, honey, wildcrafting, dairy, goats, nuts, berries, vegetables, sustainability, off grid, wood stoves, chainsaws, wood heat, tools, welding, green woodworking, farmers markets, composting toilets, straw bale homes, cob building...

Message the mods please include links to any posts you are referencing.


Homesteading - From Wikipedia

Broadly defined, homesteading is a lifestyle of self-sufficiency. It is characterized by subsistence agriculture, home preservation of foodstuffs, and it may or may not also involve the small scale production of textiles, clothing, and craftwork for household use or sale. . .


Homesteading is... ponds, barns, livestock, gardens, food preservation, outdoor kitchens, fishing, hunting, shop projects, tractors, bush hogs, pigs, raising chickens, cattle, worms, 4H, permaculture, organic practices, cast iron skillet, neighbor relations, frugality, 5 gallon buckets, crops, grazing, fences, lumber, canning, aquaculture, trees, woodland, diatomaceous earth, farmers, root cellars, smoke houses, mason jars, agriculture, agronomy, horticulture, critter shelter, farm interns, wwoofers, bees, honey, wildcrafting, dairy, goats, raised garden beds, paddock shift systems, nuts, berries, vegetables, growing sweet potatoes, self sufficiency, permaculture design course, off grid, alternative building, alternative energy, wood stoves, chainsaws , wood heat, tools, welding, woodworking, green woodworking, joel salatin, red worms, sepp holzer, masanobu fukuoka, ianto evans, art ludwig, farmers markets, animal husbandry, cottage industry, outhouses, composting toilets, septic tanks, ferro cement, straw bale construction, cob building...


General Guidelines and Rules:

  • Try and keep post on topic, self post and blog links are okay as long as they're related to homesteading.
  • Be respectful and we will ban people for being icky.
  • Please try and use reddit tags like; [Question], [Discussion], [News], [Update] [Meta], or homestead specific like; [Growing], [Chickens], [Livestock], etc.. This will help keep things organized among other things.
  • Oh yes, trolls will be banned. Self posters are welcome.
  • No shaming to vegans or for animal processing. NSFW tags are OPs choice part 1 part 2

Related Subreddits:


Other links:


Zone Maps of the World:


Thanks for stoping by and happy homesteading!

/r/homestead

2,783,022 Subscribers

3

Black Poly Pipe

I need water at the garden, but don't want to bury the pipe. Is the black Poly pipe, available at Lowe's or HD, able to withstand the suns UV rays?

I'll probably just lay it along the fence, for the most part and leave it in place for years.

20 Comments
2024/02/12
12:33 UTC

43

I have 5 acres of protected forest that I can't develop, is there anything else environmentally friendly that land can also be used for?

Last year I bought 6acres of land in Maryland, US and built my house and yard on the first acre of it. The rest is a forest protected by a conservation easement - this means that I cannot cut anything down or build anything up in that area without a very lengthy and expensive approval process with the county, which I've heard is a nightmare. Moreover, I'm not currently interested in heavily developing that area anyway and I am happy to conserve the forest and creek.

However, I did want to look into whether there is anything additionally good I can do with these 5 unused acres. And by good I mean good for animals/the environment. Before I moved I envisioned that I could rescue abused/unwanted donekys or something and let them roam around those 5acres, you know, make good use of the land without violating the conservation easement. I had also considered letting the local beekeepers use that land to relocate their rescued hives. All I know is that based on a soil test and monitoring what naturally grows there, it would be incredibly difficult to raise wildflowers there or anything besides pokeweed 🙄. I had an arborist come out to look at everything and they said under our county rules, I could start a tree nursery back there but I don't currently have the skills or time to figure out how to start a nursery business and that's more commercial than I was looking to do with that land anyway. Plus planting anything bigger than a bush requires that lengthy county approval process.

Anyone have any suggestions for what else I can do with that 5acres of protected forest that would be good for animals and/or the environment? Or is the best thing for the earth really just for me to absolutely leave it all alone?

62 Comments
2024/02/12
12:00 UTC

1

Looking to make my first home/land purchase

(Not sure if this is the best sub for this topic) A property in my area has popped up and has alot of features I want; 10 acres, a decent sized shop and a couple established animal pins. Plus water(well), power, septic and priced well under 200k. It's only issue is the manufactured home on it! It's a 1972, and untitled so it can't be mortgaged through a FHA or conventional. I haven't spoke to a realtor yet but the only terms that were listed is Cash. I'm not sure what all my options might be? Try to negotiate an owner carry situation so I could live in the current structure or try to get a construction loan to build something that can be mortgaged is all I can think of! Any insight would be great! thanks

6 Comments
2024/02/12
06:12 UTC

1

HELP RUNNING WATER LINES

Hey y’all, I need some help regarding waterlines.

I have to run my water line approximately .5/mile to where I’m building my house, I have had mixed advice regarding what material to use. I think a poly lines of sorts is going to be the way to go, if y’all agree can y’all point me in the correct direction to what kind of material to use? Also, I know the depth that it is buried at depends on the freeze depth (I know there is another term for this) for that state, but what would you guys recommend as a minimum?

Thanks in advance!

11 Comments
2024/02/12
05:39 UTC

2

In need of a small DC electric fence energizer

So I am in need of a small 2 mile or less, 0.5 or less joule DC energizer. I am not able to get this to an area with sun and there is no outlet. My thought is that I could purchase 2 batteries with a wall charger, bring them in and charge them and be good to go. However, I don’t see any options for anything like this? Any thoughts or suggestions?

3 Comments
2024/02/12
04:49 UTC

9

How often do you let your chicken fertilized eggs hatch?

I'm getting into homesteading and can't wrap my head around how farming chickens work. So you have 4 hens 1 rooster. After 3 years or so the hens lay less eggs(for example) is that when you would let eggs hatch? Idk how else to phrase my question? Essentially what's the cycle of chickens or homesteading farm animals?

13 Comments
2024/02/12
02:59 UTC

3

Cow advice wanted!

My husband and I are thinking about adding a dairy cow to our farm.

What advice do you wish you knew before you got a cow?

24 Comments
2024/02/12
01:39 UTC

59

‘Tis the Season. 🍁🍁

3 Comments
2024/02/12
01:26 UTC

0

Homesteading in the Caribbean

Any US nationals set up shop in the islands? I’m absolutely infatuated by all things ocean and beach (thalassamaniac?) and try to visit the Caribbean at least once a year. Firstly, what island are you on? What is your experience homesteading in the Caribbean? What do you do for work? Any details are greatly appreciated.

10 Comments
2024/02/12
00:51 UTC

2

Looking for Salix alba var. vitellina, its a zone2 cold tolerant 'yellow willow'

Does anyone have "Salix alba var. vitellina" growing on their property that would be interested in sending out a few cuttings?

It can be used for creating living structures on a property. I was going to see if we could create a living structure for our ducks with it after a few years of growth but I need a few dozen cuttings to get started.

You can do some pretty cool stuff with willow, I have some black willow but it's not as good for living structures.

0 Comments
2024/02/12
00:40 UTC

1

Hackberry valuable as firewood?

Anyone have specific experience with this? Google searching made it seem like a cross between ash and soft maple. I have already cut and split a bunch of it this month while cleaning up blowdowns, and it is stacked on pallets. Just curious how well it will burn and if it is worth cutting up more that is down in the woods. I have a ton of premium wood already like oak and hickory, so a decent burning mid grade wood is fine. Indoor wood stove only.

My first impression is that it is decently dense, straight grained, not too sappy. I'm cautiously optimistic.

3 Comments
2024/02/11
23:40 UTC

2

What to do with roses after wintering?

After the snow cover melts, small holes will need to be made in the shelters for the roses (this will prevent the development of spores and provide natural ventilation). In good weather, you can open the rose, and completely remove the cover after there are no night frosts, when the average daytime temperature reaches +10. In any case, it is better to do the opening gradually, over one to two weeks. For a full opening, it is better to choose a day that is not entirely sunny.

Pruning roses. Spring pruning is required; blackened, broken, dried shoots are removed. We advise you to prune two weeks after you remove the shelter, so it will be clearly visible which shoots did not survive the winter. The shoots are cut to the first living bud, with an oblique cut. This pruning creates growing bushes. Sections can be treated with brilliant green. After pruning, the spores accumulated over the winter are removed from the plant and the soil is loosened.

Care. For prevention, before the buds swell, you need to spray the plant and surrounding soil with a solution of copper sulfate (2%). You can use special solutions: Azophos, Funzadol, Topsin. It is better to do this a few days after pruning. If the soil is too dry, water it well after fertilizing. Loosen the soil more often to avoid stagnation of moisture.

By following these tips, roses will come to life faster after wintering and gain strength.

0 Comments
2024/02/11
23:37 UTC

44

First pouring of maple for the season!

3 Comments
2024/02/11
22:26 UTC

0

.22 Air Rifle to Stun a Pig?

I haven't begun to raise pigs myself yet, but I have watched plenty of videos online of the the slaughter and butcher process, since it is an animal I could see raising down the line. Anyways, usually I see the owner shoot the pig point blank with a .22 rifle, and then slit the throat to bleed it out.

I own a .22 air rifle I use to kill rabbits fairly quietly. While slightly slower than a .22, it shoots a projectile at about 1000 FPM. That said, would this be powerful enough to be used in place of a traditional .22 rifle?

25 Comments
2024/02/11
22:09 UTC

13

Newbie gardener/homesteader concerned about environmental pollutants and poor water quality affecting garden veggies/fruits. Advice?

Water quality in my area is poor. Add that to constant development brush burning and my neighbors pesticide spraying. What can I do to protect my new veggie garden and fruit trees from absorbing these contaminants? I’m trying to use organic, pesticide-free alternatives but other than the water quality, the nearby pollution is new this year (new neighbors and new developments popping up everywhere). Not sure if this is the right sub for it but I may try to cross-post in a gardening sub too. TIA!

12 Comments
2024/02/11
22:01 UTC

247

Genuine Question About Race. No Hostility Intended To Anyone!!! (Mildly Political)

To start, I am a black 20-year-old male and I eventually want to get into homesteading for many reasons but mainly because I want to be as community-driven as I can as well as consume better and as little as possible.

So, I have experienced plenty of distasteful treatment, to say the least, both for my skin and political views which, I assume go against what the majority of rural living people align with. I won't go into detail on my views as I don't think this is the best place for this so, I will focus on the race aspect.

Do I need to worry about racism, covert or overt? Yes, I know there is potential for any place at all but, is it something that would be enough to warrant second-guessing this lifestyle? I would love to hear from everyone but especially black and or POC.

Mods please delete this if this is not an appropriate question, I am very aware that this is a subject that people either do not want to talk about or can't. I apologize to everyone in advance. I truly mean no harm here and I do enjoy this community and hope to Put it all into practice one day. Thank you all.

253 Comments
2024/02/11
20:00 UTC

0

Any help is nice

0 Comments
2024/02/11
19:51 UTC

11

Ducks vs chicken

This spring we are thinking of getting some birds. It would likely just be a handful (~6) and would be for eggs, not meat birds. Anyone have any experiences or recomendations on one or the other?

36 Comments
2024/02/11
19:33 UTC

2

Making Plans For Future

What are some favorite resources to begin the homestead long-term planning process? (about 5-6 years down the road for me) I am soon to be active duty military (USCG) so while my life will be transient for the next few years, I still want to think ahead. what skills can I work on that will prepare me for later? What classes can I take online or maybe locally (PNW area)? Financial resources for vets, etc. When you all make your dream homestead lists, what do you include/plan for, etc. Any & all thoughts will help me just to start some gears turning :)

0 Comments
2024/02/11
19:06 UTC

7

satellite phones

I live in a rural little valley. In our area there’s no cell service and we use satellite internet. Power outages can be quite frequent but we have a landline, local radio group, and generators, so we (almost) always have contact options. Roads can also get blocked and unable to travel into town quickly, and the town sometimes loses all power too.

There will soon be NO land line service from the provider we’ve had for years. Can’t put sole trust in our internet as it’s been damaged before and knocked out until we get replacement parts. Our radio group is great but just our neighbors—no way of letting my grandmother on the opposite coast, for example, know that everything’s ok.

Does anyone have a sat phone in case of emergencies only? The plans are monthly and quite expensive. I’m hoping to invest in a communication option that doesn’t require monthly plans or prepaid sims that need to be used within a year. The initial cost isn’t an issue, but having to continually pay “just in case” would be.

9 Comments
2024/02/11
18:31 UTC

3

Anna apples

Just acquired 2 Anna apple trees for the garden. I had some Dorset Golden apples a few years ago but gave up on apples after they died. Today is my first time trying again with apples, anyone got tips of how to keep them going good?

0 Comments
2024/02/11
18:30 UTC

66

fresh broccoli from the garden

3 Comments
2024/02/11
17:13 UTC

9

Dog stealing duck eggs? (I used the chicken flair cuz idk what one to use for this 😭)

Some of our dogs (we have a lot of dogs) are stealing our duck eggs. I'm not sure how to prevent it because the "duck coop" is what used to be our old horse trailer so the door is big and ducks don't rlly jump so where the chickens used to lay eggs safely is outta the picture. Anything we could build? Or make it so the dogs don't wanna go in there?

9 Comments
2024/02/11
16:51 UTC

356

First calf of the season is here :) what to name it?

My 6yr old is trying to decide between Cloud, Sunshine and Buttercup

249 Comments
2024/02/11
16:26 UTC

0

Anyone in New Hampshire build their own driveway up a steep ish grade?

We found a massive chunk of land that is too well priced to overlook. It's limiting factor right now is that it's frontage is has a steepish grade up to where the ideal build site is. The elevation difference from the frontage is about 300ft to the proposed build site, with a direct distance of about 1100 feet. Though the driveway would snake up the hill, totalling about 1500ft. (I know, that would be an expensive driveway, but with this amount of land we have to consider all possibilities before we say no). The land is somewhat naturally terraced already, so there could be potential building sites half way up the hill. I'd love to hear some stories, good and bad, of people in NH specifically building their own driveways.

11 Comments
2024/02/11
15:56 UTC

1

Drain in basement leads to septic tank.

3 Comments
2024/02/11
15:19 UTC

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