/r/bees

Photograph via snooOG

Bees - The only reason you are ALIVE is that the bees decided to let you live.

HELP SAVE THE BEES! 🐝❤️


The Bees Reddit

Bees - flying insects closely related to wasps and ants, and are known for their role in pollination and for producing honey and beeswax. Bees are a monophyletic lineage within the superfamily Apoidea, presently considered as a clade Anthophila. There are nearly 20,000 known species of bees in seven to nine recognized families, though many are undescribed and the actual number is probably higher. They are found on every continent except Antarctica, in every habitat on the planet that contains insect-pollinated flowering plants.

Bees are adapted for feeding on nectar and pollen, the former primarily as an energy source and the latter primarily for protein and other nutrients. Most pollen is used as food for larvae.

Wikipedia: Bees


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/r/bees

61,191 Subscribers

8

Carpenter Bee In Ground

I was doing some gardening last weekend and accidentally disturbed this friend. It came buzzing out of this hole in the ground and busily flew around before returning. It came and went quite a bit while I was working and the hole seemed to be its home. It looks to me like a carpenter bee, but I didn’t think they would nest in the ground. Does anyone else have any idea?

4 Comments
2024/04/18
00:51 UTC

1

How to safely remove?

Any idea how to get bees out of the little drainage hole next to my screen door? Don’t want to kill them but would like to incentivize them not to be there.

1 Comment
2024/04/18
00:33 UTC

7

Benedict the carpenter bee cleaning his toes after a good snack

I love watching his little tongue! This was Benedict just after he finished drinking some sugar water.

0 Comments
2024/04/17
22:14 UTC

1

Forcing a hive to swarm

Hey folks, needing some help with aggressive bees in my garden. They moved into the walls of an old shed and at first they were fine because we like bees; we also have another hive of bees about 20 feet away in a box that are very calm.

However the first hive I mentioned have gotten progressively more aggressive and present a safety issue. Is there a way to encourage or force a hive to swarm? I really don’t want to kill them but they are a problem. Also looking for a solution that wouldn’t upset the other nicer hive.

I’m located in Southern California.

1 Comment
2024/04/17
20:17 UTC

3

Bee id

These bees have been hovering in my yard for the past few weeks, thousands in a 10 yard area with no apparent hole. They’re not aggressive but need to be removed. Are they honeybees? I’m in central nc.

3 Comments
2024/04/17
18:08 UTC

13

Trying to identify this guy (might not be a bee)

Hey, I’m not the one who captured this (whatever it is), we found it dead behind the store, but a coworker of mine was concerned as he has never seen anything that looks like this before. We live in northeast Ohio, and I agree, never seen this type of bee (if it is a bee) before. Any help?

9 Comments
2024/04/17
18:04 UTC

1

New friend

0 Comments
2024/04/17
07:48 UTC

0

New evidence models for bees

let's discuss new, environmentally friendly models of evidence for bees. How do you like the idea of making a beehive from fabric?

1 Comment
2024/04/17
04:29 UTC

11

A honeybee on a dandelion

0 Comments
2024/04/16
22:20 UTC

3

Bee staying in one spot

Ohio, pretty sure bumble bee. It's been basically in that Same spot the entire day, it's not bothering anything and it's welcome to stay there as long as it wants but just curious if that's normal behavior and why?

3 Comments
2024/04/16
21:15 UTC

3

New neighbors right in my garden- friend or foe?

5 Comments
2024/04/16
19:55 UTC

13

Digger bee (Anthophora) in New Mexico, USA

0 Comments
2024/04/16
19:48 UTC

11

Mason bees?

I am new here, be kind.

Just got a video of this today. I have about 4 different locations on the south facing wall of my house in SW Michigan that seem to be pretty popular with these bees. My internet search indicates they are mason bees, but I would appreciate confirmation.

I am hoping that is the case since I have read they are not aggressive and I would love to support local pollinators. We have dogs the freely roam the fenced back area and I spend a lot of time back there gardening, so I would really like to keep our backyard activities without us bothering each other.

Thoughts?

5 Comments
2024/04/16
19:32 UTC

5

How to repel wasps & carpenter bees without killing them

Hello all,

I recently moved to a new townhouse and love it. The only issue is the down stairs patio and upstairs deck seemingly is a huge attractor of wasps. There are also 2 carpenter bees but I am less worried about them as they are pretty chill with us and I know typically they aren’t very aggressive. My biggest issue is with the wasps. I have two dogs and young child and there are just way too many of them. I know the importance of both wasps and carpenter bees as pollinators, but how do I deter them away from my fence, deck, patio and yard without killing them? It’s a very small yard so it shouldn’t be too tough to manage this. Thanks for the help in advance!

4 Comments
2024/04/16
16:36 UTC

1

Question about beehavior observed:

[Sorry for the title] I'm not too familiar with bees as I raise mantids specifically. But yesterday at work my coworker brought me over to this bee, (according to a bug/insect app it identified it as a Eastern Carpenter bee/honey bee, correct me if inaccurate)

My coworker said she had watched the bee pictured above carrying a second bee, it dropped it and what we watched together was this bee hovering just above the ground, positioned to directly face the bee that appeared limp and it stayed near just watching it with us for about 35 seconds completely unphased by our presence.

We then noticed after about 40 seconds the bee on the ground start to move slightly and we couldn't tell if the wind was moving it or if it was the bee itself. Just as we moved in a little bit closer, the bee that appeared dead suddenly sprung up, the bee hovering close by went up with it and their little bee body's connected and they flew off into the wind I assume maybe mating since it's spring.

Can anyone explain this behavior? Why did the bee lay dead after it was dropped? What was the other bee doing while hovering the ground close to the other one, seemingly never taking its eye off of the fallen bee, just watching it, waiting? Is there any typical mating behaviors here or that could explain some of this?

It's also so fascinating to explore creation and observe things like this. I had never seen this before. I would appreciate any insight, and apologies if anything I wrote was confusing!

0 Comments
2024/04/16
16:05 UTC

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