/r/OrganicGardening

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Organic Gardening


The Organic Gardening reddit

Organic Gardening is the science and art of growing fruits, vegetables, flowers, or ornamental plants by following the essential principles of organic agriculture in soil building and conservation, pest management, and heirloom variety preservation.

Wikipedia: organic horticulture


Note: If you want to share a link to a tool manufacturer, seed company, or any Organic Gardening related advertisement, please refer them to /r/GardenSupplies


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/r/OrganicGardening

434,988 Subscribers

2

GARDENS IN ATLANTA 🍃 DRIVING AND PLANT IDENTIFICATION #tour #atlanta

1 Comment
2024/04/02
19:49 UTC

1

Should I be concerned with seed starting trays for microgreens?

I recently ordered ten, 1020 trays from Amazon to grow microgreens in my dining room.

I just opened them, and the smell is overpowering. They smell somewhat like gasoline. I planned on growing the microgreens and harvesting them directly from the trays but am now reconsidering. Does anyone have any insight into this? Any suggestions for a friendlier alternative?

4 Comments
2024/04/02
12:48 UTC

1

Lump compost bought for Organic smallholding

I bought this compost recently, and it’s incredibly lumpy, not fine at all.

It’s been INCREDIBLY wet here in the UK which I think might be causing the issue.

We want to use it primarily for veg beds, both outside and in a few poly tunnels. What’s the best way to get rid of the lumps, raking it doesn’t seem to be cutting the mustard.

We of course create our own compost but just never seem to have enough, especially as we use the no dog method.

Any help or tips would be grand

1 Comment
2024/04/02
12:24 UTC

2

Why are me Dill seedlings wilting?

First time growing dill. These seedlings are about 4 weeks old. They were doing great until yesterday, can’t figure out what is causing them to wilt. They are quite leggy, should I be pruning them back the way you give onion seedlings “haircuts” until they thicken enough to support their own weight?

8 Comments
2024/04/02
01:22 UTC

3

Iron-X, Fiesta or other spot weed treatments for lawn?

Wondering about residual effects, in terms of:

  1. How long the area turns/stays black?

  2. How long before I can re-seed?

Thanks!

1 Comment
2024/04/01
22:47 UTC

2

what to turn tthe vineyard into

we have a 91 year old grandfather that was kind and is leaving us his small vineyard and a field. We don't really drink much wine and I am not really into the amount of fungicide that is needed to control the grape vine pests. Supposedly the soil is very dry in this field and that is why it was chosen to put a vineyard in 70 years ago. The field next to it has been rented out to someone who uses it for hay for horses. So far i have built one small raised bed on the side of the vineyard and that gets the grandfather to give us a lot of silly looks, he thinks raised beds are stupid. Anyway I am hoping to create a little farm for growing organic produce after he passes away but until then I will grow some organic veggies and do some composting. I would like to greatly reduce the vineyard someday. I wonder if there is a simple way to regenerate the soil where is has been chemically treated for years to grow grapes. Any ideas for what i could do with the vineyard in the future? I am in Zone 7a in Central Europe.

8 Comments
2024/04/01
20:26 UTC

0

Why do manufacturers claim organic herbicide is so expensive?

1 gallon of 5% acetic acid white vinegar: $3.50 16 oz bottle of dish soap (using 2 tsp or approx 0.33 oz): $2.00 To make 1 gallon of the vinegar/dish soap mixture: Cost of 1 gallon vinegar: $3.50 Cost of 0.33 oz dish soap: $2.00 * (0.33/16) = $0.04

Total Cost: $3.50 + $0.04 = $3.54

So with the estimated costs, making 1 gallon of this vinegar and dish soap cleaning solution would cost approximately $3.54.

The vinegar makes up the vast majority of the total volume and cost. The small amount of dish soap added contributes very little to the overall cost.

Organic food should be cheaper than conventional food given these calculations. Seems like the food industry is scamming us making us pay more for orangic food.

37 Comments
2024/03/31
02:35 UTC

4

Kitchen scraps

Hi folk. Spring is in the air (here in Ireland) after a long wet dark winter. Anyway, anyone have experience burying kitchen scraps? I have about a bin of kitchen scraps every two weeks and too busy to compost properly. I was thinking of digging out a part of a bed and burying kitchen scraps and putting the soil back on again. Then planting something like brassicas or mange tout in the bed. I’d this possible?

9 Comments
2024/03/30
08:22 UTC

6

Where to find a true “garden center”

Hello all, I’m wondering where to find a true “garden center”? Where one could pick up crab meal, neem meal, alfalfa meal, gypsum, etc etc. In 40 lb bags minimum . I need to find an actual store. Online shipping prices are INSANE! I was quoted nearly 1000$ for shipping my various items in my cart online. This is simply unacceptable. Any advice?

(I’m located in central Illinois)

Edit: Thank you all for the responses. Will keep this sub on my list of informative subs.

18 Comments
2024/03/29
23:55 UTC

1

Barrels Cut and Greenhouse Footer Done

After a trial and error barrel.. I was able to get the perfect fit with two simple cuts.. and retaining the 55gal volume.. Also I got the footer for the greenhouse in and secure.. time to put the 4x10 raised bed and fill it

0 Comments
2024/03/29
17:23 UTC

2

Are fruit fly lure 100% successful ?

I have been using these fruit fly lure for 2 weeks, it trap 50 to 70 fruit fly per bottle but still I found 80% of fruiting get damaged due to fly, these lure get dry very fast and smell less within 14days. what are other good option. Thanks

1 Comment
2024/03/29
17:20 UTC

2

Plant tissue culture for organic agriculture.

I'm not sure this is the best place to ask it, but I will try.. In my degree (biotechnology engineering), I'm doing a large project on plant tissue culture and I'm working on developing a fully organic plant tissue culture protocol. It's a work in progress and there are a lot of different problems I need to overcome, for now its just a project.. but the more I work on it the more I want to continue working on it later on. My question is this, in general, do you think organic agriculture could benefit from the use of plant tissue culture, and would you use it if you knew it was a fully organic process?

2 Comments
2024/03/29
14:14 UTC

1

Sẽ thật đáng tiếc nếu bạn không biết phương pháp trồng cây vụ xuân này

0 Comments
2024/03/29
13:47 UTC

7

Roundup alternatives?

Hello yall, I'm trying to convince my stepfather to use something safer than roundup. He says it's completely safe and there are no remaining traces of it in the soil after 2 weeks. He doesn't use it because it's something he loves to do, but he doesn't know what else to use. I was explaining to him my fears of using it with how many cases of cancer have been linked to it, and I don't trust big companies telling us it does no damage to soil or our health. Hand weeding is not an option, he is planning on using it in our gardens and lawn where there are too many weeds to pull, or where the stubborn weeds are that keep coming back after being hand pulled. One thing I've read is soap, does anyone here have experience with that and does it work? Any other safer alternatives? And I'd appreciate anybody sharing resources to learn more about the risks of roundup, or if you think it is safe resources to back that up. This way I can learn more and share more information. Thank you!

16 Comments
2024/03/29
02:20 UTC

2

Why should you leave the leaves - in your yard

3 Comments
2024/03/26
04:08 UTC

0

Is there a growing interest in silicon-enhanced fertilizers?

  • CHAT GPT's content on silicon-enhanced fertilizers.

Silicon-enhanced fertilizers have garnered growing interest due to their potential benefits in agricultural practices. Silicon, while not considered an essential nutrient for plant growth, has been found to enhance plant health and resilience in various ways.

Some reasons for the increasing interest in silicon-enhanced fertilizers include:

  • Enhanced Disease Resistance: Silicon can strengthen cell walls, making plants more resistant to diseases and pests. This can lead to reduced reliance on chemical pesticides.

  • Improved Stress Tolerance: Silicon helps plants withstand environmental stresses such as drought, heat, and salinity. This resilience can lead to better crop yields, particularly in challenging growing conditions.

  • Increased Nutrient Uptake: Silicon can facilitate the uptake of certain essential nutrients, such as phosphorus and potassium, by plants. This can enhance overall nutrient efficiency and plant health.

  • Enhanced Growth: Some studies suggest that silicon can promote root growth and overall plant vigor, leading to healthier and more productive crops.

As for home gardeners, there is indeed a growing interest in silicon-enhanced fertilizers.

Many gardeners are increasingly conscious of sustainable and eco-friendly gardening practices, and silicon fertilizers align with these principles by reducing the need for chemical pesticides and promoting healthier plant growth.

Additionally, home gardeners often face similar challenges as commercial growers, such as pest infestations and environmental stresses, making the potential benefits of silicon fertilizers appealing at the household level as well.

7 Comments
2024/03/23
20:39 UTC

4

Switching fertilizers for growth/blooming?

I've been hearing a lot of gardeners saying that they use a high nitrogen low phos/potassium fertilizer until their plants are large and then switch to a low nitrogen high phos/potassium for them to bloom/fruit. All of the people that I've seen do this use synthetics.

I personally only grow using organic fertilizers, so I'm wondering if I should do the same? Would I get any benefits since organic fertilizers aren't as potent? Sorry if this is a dumb question, but I haven't been able to find much info.

5 Comments
2024/03/22
02:43 UTC

2

How To Grow Cucumbers – Easy Step By Step Guide

www.justpuregardening.com/_gardening_/growing-guides/how-to-grow-cucumbers/

Cucumbers are easy to grow in most climates. They require soil with good drainage, warm temperatures, at least 6 hours of sun each day, and a lot of water.

By growing this vegetable in your home garden, you can enjoy the taste of different varieties of cucumbers.

0 Comments
2024/03/21
23:52 UTC

6

Has anyone used this? (Organic Fertilizer help)

I plan to use Bat emulsion during growth and then a fertilizer high in phos/potassium when my fruits/veg are blooming.

Anyone have experience with Morbloom? If not, then other organic recommendations are welcome. Preferably not granular though, as I use Dr. Earth right now, and it has not been great. Thanks in advance.

9 Comments
2024/03/21
22:47 UTC

4

Deciding between fertilizers

So I'm trying to use only organics for fertilizing. I'm stuck between buying separate soil amendments such as bat/seabird guano, langbeinite, kelp meal, etc. vs buying "pre-made" fertilizers (one for growing, one for flowering/fruiting).

My thought process was that Bat guano would be good to use during the growing season since it's so high in nitrogen, and then use other amendments when the plant is flowering/fruiting. I thought that buying separate soil amendments would give me better control over what nutrients are going into my plants, but some have said that pre-made fertilizers have other nutrients that plants need. Although I think there are soil amendments for that as well, but...

What would be your recommendation to me?

I grow mostly in pots, but I occasionally plant in-ground. Thanks in advance.

8 Comments
2024/03/21
17:57 UTC

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