/r/Enzymes

Photograph via snooOG

A reddit for all things relating to enzymes.


The Enzymes Reddit

Enzymes are large biological molecules responsible for the thousands of chemical interconversions that sustain life. They are highly selective catalysts, greatly accelerating both the rate and specificity of metabolic reactions, from the digestion of food to the synthesis of DNA. Most enzymes are proteins, although some catalytic RNA molecules have been identified. Enzymes adopt a specific three-dimensional structure, and may employ organic (e.g. biotin) and inorganic (e.g. magnesium ion) cofactors to assist in catalysis.

Wikipedia: enzyme


Other related reddits

/r/Enzymes

785 Subscribers

0

Someone please tell me there are better softwares than RASMOL and AutoDockTools

1 Comment
2020/02/14
18:29 UTC

1

How does the immune system 'know' if water molecules came from outside the body vs water that's already in the body? Just read a recent Yahoo news article on a girl with an allergy to water

For example I read about a girl who had an allergy to water, specifically to the water molecules themselves and intravenous saline for instance caused her to go into shock because the water molecules being introduced into her blood reacted with her antibodies. But I'm asking why someone like that wouldn't constantly be having a reaction as blood, tissue etc is mostly water? What is different about water molecules in a glass of water or saline vs water molecules already in the body? For example a sip of water sent her into shock in critical condition when she drank it by accident.

https://www.thefreelibrary.com/JUST+ONE+CUP+OF+WATER+COULD+KILL+LITTLE+HEIDI%3B+Girl%27s+deadly+allergy...-a061152595

different girl, same allergy posted 5 days ago, it isn't just her skin that is affected, her tongue swells if she drinks water too.

https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/student-suffers-extremely-rare-allergy-162316893.html

4 Comments
2019/12/04
14:04 UTC

1

Protease Difference

What is the difference between the protease found in human body and protease found in tge soil? Do they differ in classification?use?

0 Comments
2019/08/28
16:17 UTC

2

Do enzymes reactions follow the same equlibrium laws as other reactions?

If there are more products then reaction is product favored.

0 Comments
2019/05/06
10:26 UTC

0

ok.

0 Comments
2019/04/16
10:57 UTC

6

Someone’s Waste is Another One’s Treasure: Zero Waste in the Paper Industry

With the dawn of the digital age, experts have predicted the demand for paper would drop significantly. Thus the waste it produces would also decrease, giving hope to a more sustainable environment. However, it seems like it was just a pipe-dream since the demand for paper is expected to double by 2030. The Paper Industry Waste Management: Is the Paper Industry Really the Bad Boy?

The paper industry is in the crosshairs of environmentally-sensitive people and organisations for quite long. First of all, trees- the major elements in the environment we are trying to save-need to be chopped down to produce paper. Which means the primary - if not the only - source of oxygen is also the raw material for paper industry. Also, trees are not the only raw materials that the paper industry needs. The industry also uses water and mix it with many chemicals before releasing to the environment- wastes, going directly back into the soil and other freshwater sources.

And the statistics about paper industry are terrifying, to say the least.

Almost 40% of all chopped trees are diverted to paper production every year. Additionally; in order to produce 1 kg of paper, 324 litres of water is needed. Water is usually released to the environment after being mixed with chemicals used in the bleaching process, so it is obvious that the paper industry uses consumes crucial natural resources in addition to trees.

The pulp and paper industry is the 4th largest industrial user of energy, consuming 1.8 Billion MWh in 2005, and a significant emitter of greenhouse gases. Worldwide, the pulp and paper industry is the fifth largest consumer of energy, accounting for 4% of all the world’s energy use. In 2011, there were 81 mills drawing wood from the Southeastern region of the United States, and they were producing over 20,000 tons of paper sludge per day, which is enough to fill 20 olympic sized swimming pools with waste, every day.

Is it Possible to Conduct a Sustainable Paper Industry?

Aforementioned scary environmental facts supported by numbers show us the need for a novel waste “management strategy”. Current practice, which is simply dumping the waste into landfills and covering it up, is causing the land to become unusable for a long period of time. That means that paper and pulp industry not only consumes valuable natural resources that are crucial for human life but also the industry is consuming land itself, too.

Despite all the facts and terrifying numbers, we can’t expect a whole industry to close up shop and leave. Precautions and sustainability measures can also be imposed, but only up to a point. Because these measures are usually costly and industries pose a strong resistance when you ask them to give up their profitability.

An ideal approach will be to offer a solution that will both be beneficial for the pulp and paper industry and the environment. Hence the phrase in the title. “A man’s waste is another man’s treasure.” Paper industry’s waste is actually a treasure...

A Novel Technology Converting Paper Sludge to Valuable Products

Biotechnology offers very feasible and profitable innovative ways for the paper and pulp industry to become more environment-friendly and not only keep their profitability but also increase it. With the help of Epicellulyse XTTM technology, the paper pulp can be converted into nutrient-rich fertilizer and biogas. The Epicellulyse XT technology is based on Episome Biotech’s natural enzyme, CelluRise. The live enzyme can breakdown the cellulose in paper sludge and can release high energy sugars from the waste, an optimal raw material for biogas production.

Epicellulyse XT has 2 main outputs: Biogas and organic fertilizers. Both outputs are indispensable elements of a circular economy! Organic fertilizers are needed for healthier and sustainable food production and biogas is a next generation environmentally friendly biofuel that can be used instead of fossil fuels. Both organic fertilizers and biofuels are commodity products that have an established markets and high values.

By the means of using Epicellulyse XT, pulp and paper industry cannot only acquire a zero waste policy but can also become even more profitable. Considering fuel and chemical fertilizer production, these are two other major sectors contributing to pollution and global warming. Pulp and paper industry can improve their non-green image by adopting zero waste policies in a profitable manner.

0 Comments
2019/01/15
13:25 UTC

2

Is there any relationship between how substrate entry affects the catalytic activity of enzyme?

2 Comments
2018/11/15
10:34 UTC

3

I want to build enzymes. Please give me a reading list....

Hi,

I want to learn to build enzymes. Could someone please give me a list of reading materials I should cover to learn the fundamentals of enzyme structures and building them?

I have a background in Biology(and took a course of Biochemistry) but I never got a chance to learn how to build enzymes. Appreciate if someone could help here.

Thanks

6 Comments
2018/06/14
14:01 UTC

1

Advancements in protein purification

Can someone from the field of protein chemistry brief me on the latest technology (and the working principle) used in purification of proteins? I'm trying to write a scientific essay on the topic and want to emphasize on the advancements in the field as opposed to just writing about the classical techniques. All help is much appreciated.

2 Comments
2018/02/25
05:15 UTC

1

Need help finding a supplement - Intestinal Alkaline Phosphatase, IAP. (X-post from /r/ibs)

0 Comments
2018/01/04
05:35 UTC

1

created apps to learn biochemistry

I want to share some biochemistry apps I created for the apple app store. You can find them listed as biochemistry study aids extended bundle. I have some other apps too for endocrinology, amino acids, geology and pharmacy drugs. please take a look and if they can help you or someone you know then please share!

0 Comments
2017/11/15
18:06 UTC

1

how are lyases synthases?

dont lyase break bonds, and synthases form bonds? how can synthase be a subgroup of lyase?

1 Comment
2017/09/24
09:31 UTC

2

Laundry detergent and hair

After the rinse cycle, some residual laundry detergent is usually left in the laundry. Most laundry detergents contain proteases, so some protease must be left. I don't think dryers are hot enough to denature them (as far as I can read, detergent proteases are formulated to be stable in 30 - 70 C (86 - 158 F)). So protease is left in the clean laundry. Wrapping a towel around wet hair or sleeping with wet hair on sheets/bed linen washed recently should then transfer protease to the hair, damaging it. Am I right?

study on detergent used to extract DNA

Novozymes proteases

Common enzymes in laundry detergent

0 Comments
2017/06/04
18:09 UTC

2

Is it possible to make enzyme after completing a degree in Biochemistry?

I have a strong interest in protein structure and enzyme functions since I have a rare disease so my body couldn't not produce a specific enzyme, there is enzyme therapy available for my disease. I'm planning to do a bachelor degree in Biochemistry. s it possible to make enzyme as enzyme therapy after completing a degree in Biochemistry?

1 Comment
2017/02/16
06:14 UTC

5

How long does it take for enzyme concentration to recover?

Specifically desaturase and elongase enzymes. It's known that at high temperatures the genes aren't expressed so they aren't produced as much and that they aren't active at high temperatures.

So if I had a sample at a high temperature and then lowered it to an optimal temperature, how long would recovery take?

0 Comments
2016/12/09
09:37 UTC

1

Can anyone explain the meaning of the unit Ugds^-1?

I'm preparing a presentation for a bioprocess engineering course and one of the sources I'm using has given the activity of their amylase solution as Ugds^-1. I can't find the definition of this unit anywhere. I thought perhaps it stood for (Unitgramday)/second but then I don't understand why there would be two time units. Any help would be very much appreciated.

2 Comments
2016/11/30
05:45 UTC

1

β(2,1) bonds in inulin

Any ideas on what enzymes will hydrolyze β(2,1) bonds in inulin that are commercially viable. I am trying to convert inulins into fructose and glucose for fermentation, and inulinase is not commercially viable for what I am trying to do. Wondering if there are other enzymes that might work at a cheaper cost.

2 Comments
2016/10/24
15:01 UTC

1

Enzymes that purify pool and drinking water

Did you know enzymes can purify water? Not just pools, but even drinking water?! Who would've thought enzymes could clean up water? Those little things digest the oddest things. Check it out here: http://orendatech.com/swimming-pools/

0 Comments
2016/06/03
22:04 UTC

1

What's the point in high-enzyme foods?

I've noticed that many articles and books on nutrition also talk about enzymes. Some websites even list high-enzyme foods we are supposed to eat. There's supposed to be some nutritional benefit in eating enzymes. They always forget to name the enzymes that are supposed to be so good for us. I've been unable to find any reputable sources saying anything even remotely related to this topic. Does such evidence even exist?

0 Comments
2016/02/25
17:19 UTC

1

Good place for small orders of bulk sucrase?

AllDayChemist is sold out. The only other vendor I found is AliBaba, and of course I'd have to buy a kg :(

Any other reliable vendors offering this enzyme? I was hoping to use it for an experiment with sucralose.

0 Comments
2015/04/03
02:05 UTC

Back To Top