/r/epigenetics

Photograph via snooOG

The study of changes in gene expression or cellular phenotype caused by mechanisms other than changes in the underlying DNA sequence.

In biology, and specifically genetics, epigenetics is the study of changes in gene expression or cellular phenotype, caused by mechanisms other than changes in the underlying DNA sequence – hence the name epi- (Greek: επί- over, above, outer) -genetics, some of which have been shown to be heritable.

--Wikipedia


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/r/epigenetics

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10

Bioelectricity and epigenetics - skepticism?

Hi everyone!

I've always been intrigued by cell biology, and my journey of self-education recently led me to explore the concept of cell communication. Along the way, I stumbled upon the fascinating field of bioelectricity. As I went deeper, I became particularly interested in the work of Michael Levin on bioelectricity and its role as a conduit for biological information. From what I've gathered, bioelectricity is more than just a biological curiosity; it intersects with the realm of epigenetics, showing potential for controlling gene expression by tweaking bioelectric profiles.

Perhaps my background as a molecular physicist/engineer, a field quite distinct from cell biology, amplifies my fascination with how bioelectricity can manipulate gene expression in ways that seem almost science fiction. I might also be capturing the wrong picture here, so my apologies in advance.

Moreover, I've noted that epigenetics, despite its significant contributions, had faced skepticism until about 60 years ago when perceptions began to shift. This historical context makes me wonder if bioelectricity's relatively low profile compared to more buzzworthy topics like gene editing and CRISPR is due to a similar phase of emerging credibility.

I'd love to hear your thoughts on this. Is bioelectricity on the cusp of becoming a mainstream topic in biology, medicine, and genetics, or does it still need to overcome a hurdle of skepticism akin to what epigenetics faced in its early days?

Ps.: I posted this on /physiology too.

3 Comments
2024/04/08
21:27 UTC

0

Resources for studying biological techniques and their applications

Please suggest resources (YouTube, video lectures or sites) to study different tools and techniques used in molecular biology, biotechnology, cell biology research

It should give a brief idea about the technique and explain how they can be used to solve problems in biology

1 Comment
2024/04/05
08:20 UTC

0

How can i fix my epigenetics

Did anyone one here read about post accutane syndrome We have theory that accutane messed up with our genetics So we have permenant side effects so how to fix or reverse my genetics

2 Comments
2024/04/05
02:05 UTC

0

Guys I Need Help

Hi guys, I know this post is going to feel weird but unfortunately my anxiety doesn’t give me peace.

I suffer from anxiety and obsessive compulsive disorder since a long time and I also study biology at University (1st year).

Unfortunately my studies have mixed with my psychological problems and I’ve unlocked a set of new fears I never had before.

A lot of them are related to my physical appearance.

To sum up, I am scared that the body can modify even as an adult, and my head is convinced that thoughts can drive epigenetic changes that change the bone structure slowly etc.

For example, I have a cousin that is super nice but doesn’t really look that good physically. Yesterday while I was yawning, I inspired a big flux of oxygen and in that moment I was thinking about him (his face, body etc.). From that moment I started thinking that I switched on some epigenetic switch and that I’ll be slowly become like him.

I know it doesn’t sound nice, but I didn’t know how to write it in another way.

These intrusive thoughts are destroying my life, productivity, studies, etc.

Some of them are not rational, but my head still believes them.

What can I do to exit these mental loops? Can anybody tell me if epigenetics can be this powerful and can be triggered by single-hit events?

5 Comments
2024/04/04
11:13 UTC

3

Has anyone used thedesignergene co and “body by design” for epigenetics testing and finding best lifestyle / supplements to thrive? If not, would love to hear used someone else? TIA

4 Comments
2024/04/03
15:16 UTC

8

Addiction Research

Hey there! First time posting here.

I'm a Sophomore in college and recently submitted for publication of a literature review I've conducted on the role of epigenetics in opioid addiction and treatment (which included hypothesizing CRISPR as a treatment). I'm looking for some advice on where to go next. I'm currently attending school online and live in a rural area where I don't have access to Neuroscience labs.

I'm also finding it hard to find epigenetic labs in general, even at the university of washington. Should I try to find a cancer lab to volunteer in to get some experience with epigenetic-centered lab work or should I start working on another review?

Thanks in advance and if you have any other advice for someone looking to enter the addiction research part of this field, feel free to share!

3 Comments
2024/03/29
17:18 UTC

1

Ideal conditions for hormone-targeted epigenetic upregulation?

I recently learned about the effects of HDACis on gene expression --in that they block HDAC from inhibiting transcription-- and I, nootropic fan that I am, have been enamored ever since.

I have been toying with the idea of priming the hormone/neurotransmitter pathways that I hope to change using the classical method (agonizing/inhibiting for up/down regulation) as a stage one.

Stage two would consist of doing the opposite of stage one (agonize or inhibit), alongside a protocol of an HDACi and a methyl donor.

(I have yet to decide on a chemical candidate for these tasks, this could be a slow burn, repeating the process at increasing intensity, starting with increasing butyrate.)

Anyways, cutting to the chase: though it likely varies at the level of individual genes, as a general rule, if I wanted to increase BDNF epigenetically for example I would do things in the following order, right? Is there any good research on this topic?

  1. Downregulate BDNF via agonization.

  2. Inhibit HDAC and provide methyl donors while upregulating BDNF via inhibition.

  3. Stop dosing HDACi and methyl donor BEFORE peak upregulation by dose.

  4. Stop dosing BDNF inhibitor once HDACi has cleared my system.

And the opposite would hold true if I wanted decrease BDNF?

Lastly: any suggestions on HDACis and methyl donors that are easily obtained and useful for my purposes?

Also, I assume this process may be less effective with more delicate systems like androgens, would this protocol still work in these cases?

Downregulated testosterone may provide opportunities to encode for increased testosterone, for example, but wouldn't it also provide just as many opportunities to encode for muscular atrophy and increased estrogen activity? Are there tweaks that can be made to the protocol to get around these issues?

Thanks in advance!

5 Comments
2024/03/22
20:37 UTC

1

What is known about epigenetics and sexual orientation?

What is known about how epigenetics contribute to sexual orientation?

3 Comments
2024/03/19
21:06 UTC

1

RRBS Troubleshooting

Hi everyone,

I am trying to optimize the RRBS protocol in lab. We are experiencing an issue with MspI digestion and subsequent size selection with BluePippin (size selecting for 100-220 bp.)

We use about 600-1000ng of genetic material when we start. We've tried MspI digestion for anywhere from 16-22 hours, but it doesn't seem to make a difference.

After MspI digestion, we ran the sample on a 0.7% agarose gel and we found that there was smearing, but it looks like a very low amount around the 100-200 range. This leaves very little material for sequencing downstream.

Has anyone else experienced this issue, and knows get more material when size selecting?

0 Comments
2024/03/18
16:40 UTC

3

How to investigate eary epigenetic event?

Hi epigenetics,
I'm investigating changes in epigenetic lendscape on cancer upon treatment, that then drive the chemioresistance.
We have some time points in which we investigate cells with ATAC and CUT&TAG but in your opinion, to have a better understanding of the tumor epigenetics before and immediately after the treatment (24h), just to have a global idea of what is occurring epigenetically, which technique I should apply? Bisulfate conversion? Mass specrtometry on histones? What do you suggest? Thanksss

2 Comments
2024/03/15
08:47 UTC

3

Cann anyone help me understand this? Why is there a correlation. For me it looks like there is 100% no correlation. Link to study: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/41623876_DNA_methylation_of_the_POMC_gene_promoter_is_associated_with_craving_in_alcohol_dependence

6 Comments
2024/03/14
20:54 UTC

2

Help finding this paper (if it exists)

I heard once about a study that went something like this: Some animals (daphnia?) were experimentally stressed and their epigenetic marks reflected that state. Then, either within those individuals over time, or across generations, at some point the organisms went through a period where the epigenetic stress signature was "erased", but then the signature came back later. It implied that the information about the stress state was stored elsewhere and got re-imprinted into the epigenetic marks.

Is this real? Could someone help me find it? Edit: typo

1 Comment
2024/03/12
18:04 UTC

4

Could I be experiencing PTSD from my parents’ trauma? *Trigger warning* CSA

29F In the last few years I’ve been demonstrating PTSD symptoms including dreams, images/impressions, and panic attacks and dissociation triggered by topics of child s**ual abuse and certain touches during intimacy. The thing is, I’ve never experienced CSA; my parents, however, both have. In fact, on my mother’s side it goes back multiple generations. Could this sort of reaction/experience be the result of epigenetic trauma?

Please don’t mention repressed memories, I’ve been down that rabbit hole and don’t want this discussion to become about that.

I’m sorry if this is not the appropriate subreddit for this but I really wanted the opinions of those who are more knowledgeable about epigenetics. Thank you in advance for any insights.

15 Comments
2024/03/11
17:47 UTC

2

Epigenetic changes permanent?

Are epigenetic changes generally permanent or transient? Is there a way to undo them? Take post finasteride syndrome as an example, the the leading theory is that this is caused by epigenetic changes. Can these be undone? Sorry if this seems like a silly question just trying to understand

9 Comments
2024/03/11
12:33 UTC

2

Help me formulate a hypothesis please

I’m reading Yuval Noah Harari’s book Sapiens and I have a rudimentary pondering that I’m wondering if it feels even remotely scientifically supported If Homo erectus was the most durable human species, lasted 2 million years and was the species that could best adapt to the cold environment… could we then surmise that humans surviving for generations in hot desert climates will be the ones best equipped to survive climate change?

3 Comments
2024/03/09
21:43 UTC

4

Methyclock R package

Hi has anyone computed the methylclock R package clocks. It's relatively straight forward but the thing is, is that I haven't been able to interpret the age and age acceleration estimates of the clocks because I still don't really understand each clock, having read the papers and computed the estimates. What do they actually show and so I understand Horvath hannumm and kinda phenoage and grimage, but what about DNATL (how is this different to normal telomere length measurements), what about Wu et Al's clock. You know...BLUP clock. Any videos or good resources or simple explanations would really help... Thank you

2 Comments
2024/03/07
14:08 UTC

4

Placental methylome. Is it identical to the mother or fetus? Both? Neither? Please help.

Currently working on my Master’s thesis and am really confused by this. My project is on differential methylation associated with exposure to a water pollutant. The DNA was extracted from tissue from the maternal side of the placenta after birth for 10 subjects. 5 subjects had high pollution exposure and 5 had low pollution exposure.

Whose methylome am I looking at here? Mother or baby? Both? What about the paternal genome, where does that come in?

Does the entire placenta have the same genome and methylome? Or is it different on the maternal side and fetal side?

Please help me 🫠

2 Comments
2024/03/07
01:53 UTC

2

Placental methylome. Is it identical to the mother or fetus? Both? Neither? Please help.

Currently working on my Master’s thesis and am really confused by this. My project is on differential methylation associated with exposure to a water pollutant. The DNA was extracted from tissue from the maternal side of the placenta after birth for 10 subjects. 5 subjects had high pollution exposure and 5 had low pollution exposure.

Whose methylome am I looking at here? Mother or baby? Both? What about the paternal genome, where does that come in?

Does the entire placenta have the same genome and methylome? Or is it different on the maternal side and fetal side?

Please help me 🫠

0 Comments
2024/03/07
01:53 UTC

3

Micronutrient testing

Micronutrient testing is a blood lab test that is a comprehensive nutrient analysis that measures functional deficiencies at the cellular level of a persons nutritional status.

It’s interesting because you can have the blood test done and it will say what foods one should avoid as the test could show what may be causing health problems. It can tell if you have genetic predisposition, cardio risk and looks at cellular nutrition.

It’s such a strange things because generally our diet is the cause of most diseases. Yet we live in a world where it feels complicated and difficult to eat foods that help us.

I have been trying to understand this link between nutrition and epigenetics more (if you have any resources let me know)… but I also have a question, does intuition play an important role in epigenetics?

0 Comments
2024/03/04
03:27 UTC

2

Question about procedure

What kind of procedure could change epigenetics in an adult?

1 Comment
2024/03/02
16:24 UTC

8

Novice book recs

Not sure if this is the place but I was wondering if anyone had any recommendations on books on epigenetics for the lay person? I have no science background so texts books are out of the question really but I’m interested in epigenetics and would love to learn more about it. Thanks in advance

7 Comments
2024/02/25
03:33 UTC

0

Does alcoholism skip a generation?

Both of my parents never drank. I have definitely struggled with abstaining from a drink and have teetered on the edge of being an alcoholic myself. I know my grandma on my mums side was an alcoholic and had similar mental health issues.

Does it skip a generation? How does that process work? Is it that I didn’t grow up with the (deterring) effects of alcoholic parents to nurture abstinence tendancies ?

9 Comments
2024/02/10
16:04 UTC

2

epigenetics question bank

Hi, I am currently taking an epigenetics course and have been looking for a question bank. I need practice questions to test my understanding. I have not found any, if you know where I can find one please do tell. Thank you.

0 Comments
2024/02/08
08:47 UTC

3

Linking Collective Mind Theory to Epigenetics

I thought about thisthis morning and was curious if anyone else have had this thought. I personally do believe there’s is an actual link here which could potentially solve a lot of our mental health issues, religious disputes, and other social interactions we have with one another on a daily basis. This is more of a brainstorm thread so share away

1 Comment
2024/01/30
18:57 UTC

2

Can epigenetics be changed in an adult?

7 Comments
2024/01/21
22:34 UTC

6

Do epigenetic marks themselves influence gene expression?

I'd like to know whether epigenetic marks (DNA methylation, histone acetylation, etc.) cause changes in gene expression or are caused BY changes in gene expression.

I.e., does it go "mark gets placed --> gene expression changes" or vice versa?

Is this topic discussed in the field?

Any papers on the topic would be greatly appreciated!

3 Comments
2024/01/09
01:56 UTC

0

Epigenetic Test #9: Finally, A Younger Horvath Age Than the Chronological

9 Comments
2023/11/21
20:09 UTC

1

Intergenerational Trauma, Generational Trauma & Epigenetics Clip from fu...

5 Comments
2023/11/12
04:57 UTC

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