/r/weather

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A community for discussion and posts about weather. Mostly on Earth.

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Related subreddits

/r/AskWeather For asking questions

/r/atoptics For pretty things that light does in the sky

/r/climate For the average weather, past present and future

/r/longrangechaos For not-so-realistic long-range forecasts

/r/meteorology For a more scientific weather subreddit

/r/myweatherstation For questions and discussion about buying or making your own weather station

/r/naturesfury Nature can be scary sometimes

/r/radarloops For loops.....of radar

/r/stormchasing For those who aren't content to let the storms come to them

/r/stormfront For news and first-hand reports about weather

/r/Tornadoes For twisters and twister accessories

/r/TropicalWeather Specifically for tropical cyclones

/r/WeatherCanada For discussing how the weather will affect the maple syrup crop

/r/WeatherGifs For inefficiently compressed animations of weather

/r/weathernerds For nerds

/r/Winterwx For the colder stuff


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/r/weather

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0

Question: Is there anyway to look up recent weather for the last month?

When I check the weather, it gives current or future, weather predictions.

Once in a while, I have a conversation with someone that is similar to this, hey it rained last week on Tuesday, and he'll say no, it was Wednesday. This is an example.

Or I might be just curious, if I am remembering the weather correct, for the last few weeks.

I been wondering for a while, is there anywhere that is free on the web, to type in your zipcode or City and look up recent weather, maybe from the last few weeks or month?

2 Comments
2023/02/07
23:20 UTC

5

Rare warm season nocturnal cloud to ground lightning in the cape canaveral/kenedy space center area not associated with fronts, troughs or tropical waves.

Hello all.

This is a question for any meteorologists or any folks living in the Cape Canaveral or Kennedy Space Center area, and it is about the phenomenon of rare early morning thunderstorms in the Cape Canaveral area in the warm season, not associated with fronts, troughs or synoptic disturbances. I am very familiar with Florida’s afternoon thunderstorms, the ones that are caused by day time heating, instability and the sea breeze boundaries. These thunderstorms are well forecast and have been well researched. However, on rare occasions, thunderstorms develop late at night with no apparent cause. I am not originally from Florida but I have spent many summers there so i’m quite familiar with the weather patterns, but this pattern in particular has had me doing research for a long time looking for an explanation.

One day in particular comes to my mind and it is a long time ago now, the early morning hours of July 20 2006. The day before had the usual afternoon thunderstorms, but they had ended long before midnight, and there was no indication that we were going to get early morning storms. So everything was all quiet until just before 6 o’clock that morning when we started to hear sudden thunder overhead, at that time we were staying in the villages of seaport. That was followed shortly by very heavy rain and some of the closest early morning lightning I had ever experienced in Florida. The storm was an isolated thunderstorm over the Cape Canaveral coast and only lasted i’d say about 10, 15 minutes, but it sounded like a war zone, it was much shorter than the usual afternoon thunderstorm. In the years since that I returned to Cape Canaveral and Cocoa Beach I have rarely experienced storms like that so early in the morning, and not associated with tropical disturbances, fronts and troughs. I only experienced 2 early morning storms in cape canaveral that summer, but the other one was associated with a tropical disturbance. The July 20th storm, I have concluded, was either caused by the night-time land breeze, which are usually much weaker than the sea breezes, lingering outflow boundaries that moved towards the coast late at night and they just happened to collide over Cape Canaveral at 6 o’clock in the morning, or some type of hidden forcing that was not picked up by weather radars or weather moddels. Has anyone else experienced this phenomenon before? According to a recent meteorological paper I read, these types of unexpected early morning thunderstorms are poorly understood, and there is a severe lack of knowledge about their cause. I am not sure if previous area forecast discussions can be accessed from the nws melbourne office, but it would be great if I could access those forecasts from that day, the afternoon of July 19th 2006, and the early morning hours of July 20th 2006.

The paper also had a number of interesting findings, many of these rare early morning thunderstorms took place in July, and in situations when the flow was paralel to the coast or from the southeast, and only lasted a few minutes. P.S, I am blind so i can’t read weather charts, but I can read webpages and area forecast discussions, convective outlooks etc. I use a screen reader to write and a bluetooth keyboard to write.

20 Comments
2023/02/07
19:41 UTC

41

Freezing fog in Wandsworth, London

3 Comments
2023/02/07
11:15 UTC

0

about which weather phenomena the US ppl more concern about?

0 Comments
2023/02/07
07:40 UTC

11

Question on recent cold snap in northeast - why did the cold air arrive, and where did it go?

I'm a layman when it comes to weather, please be gentle. I heard the explanation of the recent cold weather in the northeast as being due to a large mass of cold air moving way south from Canada.

Question 1: Why did the cold air move south? Is it a wiggle of the jet stream or a hiccup of the polar vortex, or something else?

Question 2: And where did the cold air go? Barely a day after the cold spell, we have 45F or better in the Boston area. Did the cold air just dissipate somewhere? Did it go back to Canada? Or out to sea??

Thank you.

8 Comments
2023/02/07
00:43 UTC

225

Arctic fog on Halifax Harbor, Feb 4, 2023. Temperature was about -25 C.

7 Comments
2023/02/07
00:14 UTC

90

Solar Halo in Illinois

4 Comments
2023/02/06
21:41 UTC

0

Todays weather all round the world

It’s either hot or cold and it’s either Sun, rain, snow or hail. It’s either cloudy or it’s not

2 Comments
2023/02/06
18:24 UTC

0

North America Snow Forecast for the Second Week of February

2 Comments
2023/02/06
10:53 UTC

81

Lunar halo that just occurred over New Jersey

7 Comments
2023/02/06
04:56 UTC

13

TIL you can get Spring Fever from +38F temperatures.

I guess -40 wind chills the day before will do that.

2 Comments
2023/02/06
04:03 UTC

1

RAW Footage of Poland Snowbomb Hurricane NOW

0 Comments
2023/02/06
00:30 UTC

4

feels like -39 was -81 on mount washington 🤯

1 Comment
2023/02/05
23:42 UTC

7

Thunderstorm cloud shadow?

I spotted this shadow in the sky last September and have always wondered what it is, if weather related. My local meteorologist said it could be a shadow from a thunderstorm cloud. Ideas or thoughts? I live in Central NY.

4 Comments
2023/02/05
23:28 UTC

356

Arctic Sea Smoke in Boston Harbor it was -40*F windchill yesterday - Brought to you from the guys at the SHIPSHAPE Podcast

30 Comments
2023/02/05
22:19 UTC

25

Pressure forecast for Tuesday - such a deep pressure low near the North Pole (image Ventusky)?!

7 Comments
2023/02/05
21:28 UTC

5

Timelapse looking south out of Grand Rapids on a cloudy day

0 Comments
2023/02/05
19:26 UTC

0

Night time. Fluctuations

What would make nighttime temperatures do little peaks like this? It's already dark. I know nothing about weather, so the answer may be obvious, I've just never seen it on my app before (Yr.no)and I look a lot. I'm in Cheltenham, England, so we're inland south west.

0 Comments
2023/02/05
17:18 UTC

2

It's a bit rainy. Up to 100 mm they say!

2 Comments
2023/02/05
17:16 UTC

50

So glad to see the sunshine this morning☀️

3 Comments
2023/02/05
16:04 UTC

2

Thunder

I just had some very loud thunder where i am and google told me this:

"The resultant outward-moving pulse is a shock wave, similar in principle to the shock wave formed by an explosion, or at the front of a supersonic aircraft. In close proximity to the source, the sound pressure level of thunder is usually 165 to 180 dB, but can exceed 200 dB in some cases."

and right after that.......

"Sounds above 150 dB have the potential of causing life-threatening issues. Sounds between 170-200 dB are so intense that they can cause lethal issues like pulmonary embolisms, pulmonary contusions, or even burst lungs. As for exploding heads, you can expect that from sounds above 240 dB"

What i want to know with the future of climate change etc - is there any chance thunder can get louder or lightning will get hotter and thunder will make our heads explode if we are near it haha - is there a shockwave limit?

I'm sure someone will reply with - i bet you're fun at parties

10 Comments
2023/02/05
15:00 UTC

24

uh oh

10 Comments
2023/02/05
09:48 UTC

5

What exactly did I observe?

I live in Riverside, California, USA. Recently, we've had a string of frost warning events when temperatures reached <40°F (I realize this is just a normal temperature for some, just know it isn't typical for this area specifically). I have a chronic health condition that messes with my circadian rhythm, and as a result I'm often sleeping and waking at really odd hours. On one of those nights, I woke from a nap in my car at around 3AM and started driving back home. As I was approaching the Santa Ana River via Van Buren, I got plunged into the thickest fog I've ever seen IRL; this on its own isn't all that strange or anything, just not commonly observed in this area. I figured the River and environment must have something to do with the phenomena. As I drove past the old air strip, the fog started thinning out, but didn't quite completely dissipate.

And it was at this point that I saw some really freaky looking stuff. I tried to take a video and some pictures but wasn't able to get a clear shot (I was still driving and not about to stop the car), and unfortunately I don't have the words to describe it sufficiently. It looked, as best as I can describe it, like a layer of some sort of cloud-like atmospheric phenomena was occurring, save for the fact that it appeared to be occurring just a little over the height of the street lamps in terms of elevation. I'm sure the time of night, the dark, the unusual temperatures, and having just driven through thick fog (not something we experience often, if at all, here in the IE) were all putting me on edge as it were, but the sight of this final phenomena put my hairs on end. Obviously, I made it home in one piece so it wasn't the end of the world or anything, but it was seriously nerve-wracking. It wasn't horrifying per se, but it gave me the same type of feeling as "uncanny valley" cranked up a notch, I suppose? It's bothered me enough that I still haven't forgotten about it and keep questioning what the hell it was that I was looking at, so I've decided to post about it here and see if I can get some expert opinions on the matter. What do you guys think? I would appreciate an evidence-based discussion ground in sound science, but know that I have zero knowledge in meteorology (I worked in industrial food safety).

3 Comments
2023/02/05
08:13 UTC

3

Update Feb 4th. Outlook for next 5 weeks..

0 Comments
2023/02/05
06:20 UTC

40

The real wind chill record is -109F

15 Comments
2023/02/05
03:43 UTC

1

Ice sculptures within lake Erie at sunset tonight

0 Comments
2023/02/05
02:42 UTC

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