/r/marinebiology

Photograph via snooOG

This is a community to share and promote marine biology research and education.

Welcome to the Marine Biology community!

For the official subreddit post about the general questions about becoming a marine biologist, internship experiences, and other resources, click here to see the post.

The objective is to create a place where every single person who cares about the sea (marine biologist or not), can share news, papers, images, opinions, ideas, questions, and everything related to this topic.

I know that being a student, nowadays, isn't a easy task, so we will try to post about internship programs, congress, and whatever possible to help us in our academic life.

For an "Other reddits you might like" section:

For identifications:

My best wishes to you all, and hope you find what you are looking for here.

Good luck!

/r/marinebiology

130,011 Subscribers

1

Any Shark Textbook recommendations?

Hello! I'm looking for a new read on a good textbook on shark biology, hopefully something less surface level that actually gets into the biology of it at a cellular and tissue level. Although, I'll accept ecology and taxonomy as well.

Thank you in advance!

0 Comments
2024/07/06
05:58 UTC

108

any id on the decomposing fish? found in norcal

17 Comments
2024/07/06
04:23 UTC

3

weird stick? malibu, ca

hello! i found this at leo carrillo in malibu, ca. when it dries out it becomes much smaller and shriveled, but if i put it back in water for a while it becomes large and squishy again. when i found it i thought it was a weird piece of driftwood or a dog treat, but now i’m thinking it might be from an animal. any ideas?

2 Comments
2024/07/05
20:33 UTC

38

Any ideas? Came out of the Fingerlakes.

4 Comments
2024/07/05
14:40 UTC

1

Organ identification in Hudson River, Cold Spring New York?

Found this on the shores of the Hudson River in Cold Spring, New York.

Anyone know what it might be?

0 Comments
2024/07/04
20:39 UTC

39

What is this thing I spotted in Adriatic Sea in Omiš in Croatia?

8 Comments
2024/07/04
12:32 UTC

1

How can someone who already has an undergrad+grad degree in a semi-STEM major (50% of the science courses a marine biologist would have taken) switch into this field? I don't mind a second masters but the pre-reqs..

Thank you in advance.

0 Comments
2024/07/04
02:57 UTC

2

Anyone able to ID these little fellas? Lawrencetown, Nova Scotia

Sorry for bad quailty, they were small so had to zoom a fair bit.

0 Comments
2024/07/03
23:05 UTC

1

ISO Aquarist/ Fisheries jobs in Oklahoma

0 Comments
2024/07/03
20:56 UTC

1

Why are Hydra considered Medusazoans when they lack a Medusa stage?

So I work with Hydra vulgaris in my lab. I’m not a marine biologist by any means, I got my biology degree studying plants so metazoans are all new to me and I’m learning as I go. But my biggest issue as of late is in the broader phylogeny of the species, I really can’t seem to find any good explanation for why Hydra are considered Medausazoans when the whole classification for medusazoa is the fact that those species have a medusa stage. Everything I find just says “All Medusazoans have a medusa stage?” “Well what about Hydra” “Oh, not them.” I want to know mooooore, I’m not suggesting that I think otherwise or that I believe they should be reclassified as anthozoans lol. I just want to know why that classification was made, was it a genetic analysis? were they eVer classified as anthozoan? I was also told Hydra ‘lost’ their medusa stage but I can’t seem to find any sources for that information. (Also when I say “I can’t find it” — I mean on surface level google searches, I haven’t spent any considerable time reading a paper on the subject because I have other labwork to do but if anybody has a paper suggestion that goes into detail on the subject I’d be sooo grateful).

1 Comment
2024/07/03
18:33 UTC

27

What is this sponge I saw in Ras Mohammed the Red Sea Egypt?

1 Comment
2024/07/03
15:24 UTC

3

Resources to get ahead of college courses?

I’ve watched animal documentaries and read books of animals for all of my life so I’m used to and pride myself of being ahead in this subject. How do I make sure that I’m ahead during college courses?

It also just gives me a sense of comfort because I know I’m behind because I have always had very little access to experience. The one time I had a breakthrough in volunteering, there was car trouble (which I’m still incredibly upset over). I don’t have a driver’s license either so I can’t drive to the closest place I would love to volunteer at either. I know I’m severely behind career-wise, but being ahead in class gives me the false hope that I am on a solid pathway already.

1 Comment
2024/07/03
12:44 UTC

2

Was this a pearl?

I found this in Clearwater, Florida. I released it back in the wild alive and was just wondering if this was a pearl inside of it. It had a holographic shine but aren’t pearls usually in the far back of them? This was more towards the front

1 Comment
2024/07/03
06:17 UTC

1

lost starfish limb frequency

what percentage of all starfish get their arms ripped off at least once in their life?

0 Comments
2024/07/03
04:45 UTC

72

What is this creature I spotted on the beach of Anacortes, WA?

11 Comments
2024/07/02
18:31 UTC

2

Can someone identify what these are? Teeth? Shell? (East Coast of Peninsula Malaysia)

I found these three teeth(?) on the east coast of Malaysia. Initially, I thought they were some kind of shell but, they are very sharp and the shape almost resembles a tooth. I asked one of the locals and they said these were sand dollar teeth but, I feel like they look too thin to be sand dollar teeth (unless they come from a specific species). Can anyone identify what these things are? I'm just a very curious person and like learning knew things :)

3 Comments
2024/07/02
10:26 UTC

0

Why is it generally accepted that there's no such thing as a fish, when ~96.3% of extant fish species are ray-finned fish, and it seems like there's very little need to call other fishy vertebrates "fish"?

"There is no such thing as a fish" is a fairly accepted notion based on the consensus that the word "fish" ultimately describes a paraphyletic group of vertebrates. However, I think this conclusion is based on a lobsided assessment, and that it's possibly (?) quite easy to restore the word "fish" to a state of monophyly. Disclaimer: I'm not an ichthyologist, and I've done minimal research for this Reddit post beyond deferring to the "Fish" Wikipedia article to make my point.

According to this Wikipedia page, ~96.3% of extant "fish" diversity (>32000 species) belongs to the class Actinopterygii (ray-finned fish), followed by ~3.3% which belongs to the class Chondrichthyes (sharks, rays, and chimaeras), leaving only ~0.4% belonging to different lineages.

Ray-finned fish are the stereotypical idea of a "fish", are the "fish" most well-known throughout history, were undoubtedly the first "fish" formally described, and likely comprise most global "fish" biomass. Ontologically speaking, these are fish, and the only group that deserves the name.

I understand the appeal of "fish" as an umbrella term for all fishy creatures, but I think it's more consistent to reconceptualise these other deeply divergent lineages as distinct from fish. Sharks, rays, and chimaeras already have their own characteristic 'vibe', as well as well-known common group names that aren't appended by "-fish"; it's already quite easy to regard these animals as non-fish swimmy things. The general obscurity of many of the remaining lesser "fish" groups should further motivates asking if it's really worth rendering the word "fish" biologically incoherent over 0.4% of extant "fish" diversity. This argument also applies to extinct "fish" lineages. Basically, if there's a limited need to call these other groups fish, why do so if it comes at the expense of the word's meaning?

The only real point of contention is the clade of "lobed-finned fish" - which includes tetrapods. This clade diverged from ray-finned fish - their nearest "fish" relatives - ~425 million years ago, and there's, like, eight extant species (excluding tetrapods). That's too much separation time, and too few living species to throw the word "fish" into disarray. Quite frankly, lobed-finned fish should not be regarded as fish. They deserve another set of common names (that wouldn't be appended by "-fish").

In conclusion, I don't know much about fish, but it's silly to say "there is no such thing as a fish" when ~96.3% of living fish species belong to just one group, and it's not that hard to rename the rest. That said, I concede that I'm probably missing something important, given that fish experts and taxonomists seem pretty chill with the paraphyly.... also, I've done no proper research to challenge my idea.

TL;DR: Ray-finned fish are the only true fish. All other "fish" should be rebranded.

10 Comments
2024/07/02
11:34 UTC

1

putting an eel tank next to an octopus tank to prevent escape, is this true?

I visited an aquarium with my oceanography class, the aquarium had the eel tank right next to the octopus tank as an escape prevention measure,

I was told that octopuses are scared of eels and having the eels next to them makes them less likely to want to escape from their tank, yet I cant find anything supporting this online?

is this just not a well known fact or is this just wrong? not that i would doubt a legitimate aquarium it just seems strange to me i cant find anything related to this online

0 Comments
2024/07/02
06:01 UTC

22

Is this plastic or natural shell??

I found a number of open, but perfectly intact Sunray Venus shells in south Florida (gulf, just south of Tampa Bay) this weekend. Almost every one had this shiny, smooth exterior layer that extended beyond the shell. What is this?

I’m a native Floridian but have never seen this before — is it is a natural outer layer?

It looks and feels exactly like plastic and peels off the shell when pulled at. It’s slightly stretchy and completely clear.

Thank you in advance!

2 Comments
2024/07/02
00:32 UTC

54

What are these creatures! Found in Pacific Beach, WA, USA... Multiple critters here!

10 Comments
2024/07/02
03:44 UTC

3

🚨 A peculiar creature encountered in Croatia. Is it Floaty McFloatface?

1 Comment
2024/07/01
19:23 UTC

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