/r/anarcho_primitivism

Photograph via snooOG

Anarcho-primitivism is an anarchist critique of the origins and progress of civilization. According to anarcho-primitivism, the shift from hunter-gatherer to agricultural subsistence gave rise to social stratification, coercion, and alienation. Anarcho-primitivists advocate a return to non-"civilized" ways of life through deindustrialisation, abolition of the division of labour or specialization, and abandonment of large-scale organization technologies.

What is this?

Anarcho-primitivism is an anarchist critique of the origins and progress of civilization. According to anarcho-primitivism, the shift from hunter-gatherer to agricultural subsistence gave rise to social stratification, coercion, and alienation. Anarcho-primitivists advocate a return to non-"civilized" ways of life through deindustrialisation, abolition of the division of labour or specialization, and abandonment of large-scale organization technologies.

Rules

Believe it or not there are rules here and they are being refined from time to time, so please check them often.

Quick List:

  1. No Shitposts

  2. No Low-effort posts

  3. Don't Be Political

  4. NOT a Unibomber fan club

  5. Attack Ideas, Not Each Other

  6. Discussion should be in Good Faith

  7. No Calls for Violence

Isn't this subreddit hypocritical?

Read this.

Previously Stickied Posts

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Overview of Hunter-Gatherer vs Civilized Thinking

Intro:

https://psyc.franklin.uga.edu/sites/default/files/CVs/Hunters%20and%20gatherers_0.pdf

Advanced:

https://www.routledgehandbooks.com/doi/10.4324/9781315728964.ch3

Inspiration

"I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived." --Henry David Thoreau

  1. Confederation of Anarchist Reddits
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/r/anarcho_primitivism

8,442 Subscribers

8

What do you think about antinatalism?

11 Comments
2024/06/19
15:09 UTC

5

Primitivist analysis of dog domestication?

I want to become more familiar with the ancient past of domestication, and seeing as dogs were the first animals to be domesticated, I see no better place to start. Anything y'all can dig up would be appreciated.

4 Comments
2024/06/19
12:09 UTC

1

Paleo diet

Is there anyone who has been following the paleo diet and felt better health results?
Paleo diet: whole, unprocessed foods, excluding dairy, grains, and legumes.

View Poll

1 Comment
2024/06/19
08:30 UTC

8

How did humans hunt on mountains?

You may find this question a bit odd, but hear me out,

Humans' top physical ability is running, particularly persistence running, we evolved in the plains of eastern and southern Africa running after big mammals (among many other prey, of course),

Eventually, we colonized almost the entire terrestrial surface of the earth, including both plains and mountains, and considering that we are not very skilled to run in mountain terrain (like a goat or a snow leopard for instance),

I was wondering, how did early hunter-gatherers hunted animals in mountain ecosystems? I'm particularly referring to areas with steep slopes and complex terrain, not moderately hilly areas,

I'm guessing it was mostly by ambushing animals and perhaps scavenging, and not much actually running, but I don't know

4 Comments
2024/06/14
12:39 UTC

12

Daniel Schmachtenberger - a quasi-primitivist philosopher?

I just listened to Nate Hagens' latest interview with Daniel Schmachtenberger, and - again - I'm completely blown away. Schmachtenberger is easily one of the smartest people I know (of), and one of the few people I agree with on over 95 percent of what he says. Highly recommended.

Many topics in this long conversation are extremely relevant to primitivism (such as a critique of technology & the notion that it's "value neutral," animism & connectedness to the non-human world and the ecosystems we inhabit, the importance of our evolutionary past as foragers & the niche we evolved in, etc.), and although Daniel seems to have a weird definition of the term "civilization," his overall conclusions are excellent. Now, he would probably disagree if one were to categorize him as a primitivist, but many of his thoughts & ideas correlate neatly with what we advocate for.

Highly recommended!

https://www.thegreatsimplification.com/episode/126-daniel-schmachtenberger-7

1 Comment
2024/06/10
02:55 UTC

3

Can anyone explain to me the difference between anarcho primitivism and luddism?

Title

11 Comments
2024/06/07
06:18 UTC

19

Thoughts on Bigfoot..?

13 Comments
2024/06/07
03:02 UTC

23

Anyone like climbing trees?

It feels very primal. Even though I suck at it and am at present just a beginner (mostly due to the mental fear of heights as opposed to lack of physical capability), it’s become a new obsession. I live in the city but there’s many trees to climb. I’ve started looking at trees and studying them for how good they are for climbing such as how much grip the bark gives, the presence of strong lateral branches and bugs (sucks to climb up and then realise you are being swarmed by ants).

Weird how stigmatised it is for adults to climb trees. It’s an excellent physical as well as mental exercise. I’m also realising how technical it is to climb a tree. It’s not just brute strength. It’s a skill. It is strangely therapeutic. When you get to nice, comfy nook in a tree, it’s like you have stepped into a different world, above the dumb, inane noise of the bustling city.

I’m pretty sure hunter gatherers would have prized the ability to climb a tree into adulthood since it would allow one to grasp at fruit and other edible plant items and bring them down onto the ground.

With the availability of trees even in some urban settings, I think more adults should climb trees for exercise and to gain a love of trees. Once you climb a tree, you gain a connection and fondness toward it. You would be sad if it was torn down by the orcs. Of course, it goes without saying, children in urban settings should also be encouraged to climb trees. I think one of the great losses of the rural to urban shift is that I don’t see kids climbing trees anymore like they surely used to in the past.

Edit:

I think if anybody has gotten tree climbing down to a science, a philosophy, a spiritual redemption back to the Garden of Eden in these modern times, it’s this guy (Leo Urban).

Check it out: This man climbs trees better than monkeys - The Real Life Tarzan

8 Comments
2024/06/06
05:01 UTC

10

The architects of techno-genocide have names and addresses

27 Comments
2024/06/05
03:34 UTC

0

Diseases and their mistaken association with agriculture

Anprims often argue that zoonotic diseases originated with the advent of agriculture (due to living near accumulated animal waste), but zoonoses can also arise among primitive populations through contact with wild animals. Where do anprims even think diseases like COVID, Ebola, Anthrax and HIV... came from?

12 Comments
2024/05/31
13:03 UTC

4

Ethics/Philosophy Behind Environmentalism

2 Comments
2024/05/26
01:50 UTC

6

Whatever happened with the Wildist Institute?

Met John Jacobi almost 10 years and connected over shared interests at the time and wondering if anyone knows what’s happened since 2017.

6 Comments
2024/05/26
01:21 UTC

1

Are anacao primitivists sympathetic to any previously exiting socialist experiments? I know most anarchists are fans of the zapatistas, many of Rojava (controversial tho) and sometimes even cuba. As an anarco primitivist, what revolution post 1900 do you see as most close to your ideals?

3 Comments
2024/05/25
05:37 UTC

6

Did ancient hunter gatherers directly perform planting?

All terrestrial animals contribute to planting, for example by dispersing seeds and releasing waste (urine, feces). I was wondering if ancient hunter gatherers dispersed seeds and did other direct actions to promote planting? Or did they act only as seed dispersers and waste releasing agents?

23 Comments
2024/05/20
10:16 UTC

15

Indigenous Native American Prophecy

1 Comment
2024/05/19
17:08 UTC

71

Join the cause

11 Comments
2024/05/18
20:15 UTC

0

How well would anprims do with diseases ?

I have read that old world diseases used to kill a lot native americans allegedly 90% of the population in some hard-hit places , so not very well. Some people say it only hit that hard because of the warfare and famine and other societal stressors induced by the colonizers , which weakened their immune systems but I don't really know .Please offer your insights on this.

14 Comments
2024/05/17
01:36 UTC

14

Is anyone feeling uncomfortable sharing information about Anprim and related topics on Reddit?

Internet is full of bots and surveillance, and Reddit is certainly not safe either. I’m sure that I’m not the only one here who cares about privacy. Is there any safe and pro-privacy platform where people could discuss about anarchism, primitivism, deep ecology, and other related topics? I don’t have much against Reddit. I like this platform. But I also think about it as a product of capitalism and imperialism, and this makes me feel sad. So I’m feeling conflicted

6 Comments
2024/05/10
10:36 UTC

18

How true is this?

This is a post from a politcal youtuber. In my readings, I've never come across cannibalism being common in hunter gatherer societies and, if it did happen, it was due to long bouts of scarcity. However, I've read more about cannibalism happening in societies that were more pastorial or seditary, but again I never got the impression it was common. In this context, these societies always seem to have practiced cannibalism because their society was collapsing -- it wasn't like humans loved eating humans.

I'm not an expert and I'd like to have a discussion. I've seen another political youtuber make this claim (also affiliated with the OP of this post) and I really think they are not comprehending what they are reading (if they even are), the perspective of the explorer is false, or they are spreading disinformation. Can you elaborate on what really has been observed?

26 Comments
2024/05/09
22:21 UTC

0

A bit of a strange question that changed my perspective on anarcho-primitivism

Imagine that scientists discovered another planet, with almost exactly the same biodiversity except there were no humans. Would you continue to care so much about the destruction of nature on this planet if you knew it still existed in its perfect form on a different planet? I.e. do you wish to protect nature for the sake of nature being something being beautiful in its own right (in which case it continues to live on another planet so its destruction here doesn't matter), or do you wish to protect nature for the selfish (although selfish isn't really the right word) reason that you take pleasure in nature's beauty (in which case you would want to fight for natures protection on this planet).

9 Comments
2024/05/02
17:11 UTC

10

How do hunter-gatherers care for long to medium length hair?

Does anyone know any historic or present techniques used?

I’ve also noticed that some people living primitively today, like Lynx Wilden, have hair that isn’t at all greasy. Hers looks light and fluffy. A comb can easily be calved, but any idea how they manage to get their hair non-greasy, in fact having volume that most people would envy. Maybe she uses some modern techniques, but unlikely, and many women in the medieval to Victorian times also managed to get silky clean hair with occasional cold washes.

Thank you!

21 Comments
2024/04/22
19:09 UTC

0

A few things to talk about

  1. Do you think it would be humane to genetically engineer humans to not have hands before abandoning technology and civilization? Hands are what makes it possible to make tools and manipulate our environment in ways such as agriculture, building homes and other things that eventually lead to modern civilization. Taking them away would prevent civilization from developing again unless natural selection caused the descendants of humanity to re-evolve dexterous appendages.

  2. What makes a meaningless life? If a life of working to survive in civilization and being a cog in a machine is a meaningless life, how is that different than working to survive in nature? Perhaps a meaningful life is not defined by what is mundane in your life but by what is not mundane, such as achievements.

  3. If living in civilization causes unneeded human suffering. Could humanity be engineered to thrive in civilization in the way humans used to thrive in nature?

7 Comments
2024/04/22
03:46 UTC

9

How do Hunter-gatherers survive in marginal Lands?

What are their survival strategies and skills? Ive read a little about the San and Inuit but i wanted to ask some people that know more about this. Thank you.

19 Comments
2024/04/20
23:18 UTC

12

The Last Based People on Earth

2 Comments
2024/04/20
06:36 UTC

18

Alternative Political Compass

1 Comment
2024/04/18
17:54 UTC

16

Anybody here forced to live in modern society but not depressed? What's your secret?

Just as the title says. How do you cope?

37 Comments
2024/04/18
05:46 UTC

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