/r/chemicalreactiongifs

Photograph via snooOG

A subreddit showcasing the complexity of those lovely little atoms, as well as other interesting science topics in gif form.

Post Categories | Apply to be a Flaired User | PHYSICAL REACTIONS ARE ALLOWED

PHYSICAL

REACTIONS

ARE

ALLOWED

About

This subreddit is dedicated to showcasing interesting and entertaining chemical reactions. Read our Wiki for more information on the types of posts you will see here.. Due to our subreddit's size and variety of interesting gifs, over time this we have grown to be accommodating to other types of chemistry, physics and biology related gifs (those who would just like to view one type may use our filters on this sidebar).


Rules

  1. Physical reactions are allowed, along with an extension of other gifs that we feel relevant to this subreddit which you can read about in our wiki here under the "Post Categories" section. Posts will be tagged accordingly based on what category they fall under.

  2. Not every post that is not a chemical reaction is a physical reaction or relevant to this subreddit's accepted posts. For example a post featuring a can being smashed or the motion of a pendulum will be removed.

  3. All link posts must be in either gif or html5 format. Any link post that is not in one of these formats will be deleted. Any interesting or relevant images or videos (whether they be about the subreddit or a demonstration) must be done in a self post.

  4. No albums of gifs allowed in link post or self post form. This is due to trouble categorizing a post which often has multiple gifs that don't fall under one category and leads to a misleading post and confusion.

  5. Reposts are allowed and will be tagged as such for filtering sake. They will not be removed unless a moderator deems the repost to be of a demonstration or particular gif that has been posted too often (e.g. Mercury(II) Thiocyanate Decomposition).

  6. All link posts must have the source of the gif/html5 video posted in the comments. We expect the original poster to do this, however if someone else does so then it will not be removed. Reposts of a post with a source that do not contain the source in the comments will be deleted.

  7. Link posts utilizing the gif/html5 format to skirt the rules will be removed. For example if a demonstration is posted that is a gif but is essentially static image then it will be removed. We will approach this rule on a case-by-case basis to avoid removing naturally slow/lengthy demonstrations to the best of our ability.

In rare cases, exceptions may be made by the moderators if a post is exceptionally intriguing and relevant to discussion in order to maintain quality standards.


Filter By Category

Chemical Reaction

Physical Reaction

Chemistry

Physics

Biology

Physics + Chemistry

Biology + Chemistry


Flaired Users

View this wiki page for the requirements to be a flaired user and how to apply.


How To Make Gifs

Please read this wiki page for a comprehensive guide on gif making.


Subscripts and Superscripts

Superscript

  • Fe2+ is written as Fe^(2+)

Subscript

  • O2 is written as O*_2_*

Arrows can be copied and pasted from below

Equilibrium arrow:

Right arrow:

Please use these to help out fellow redditors that haven't studied chemistry! Live Example.


Related Subreddits

/r/physicsgifs

/r/biologygifs

/r/spacegifs

/r/oceangifs

/r/chemistry

/r/physics

/r/biology

/r/askscience

/r/homechemistry

/r/gifv


/r/chemicalreactiongifs

1,301,377 Subscribers

133

CrO3 and EtOH Red/Ox reaction

4 Comments
2024/04/03
09:15 UTC

78

Copper (II) chloride aqueous solution reacting with aluminum foil and steel plies. 2x speed so it file size would upload

5 Comments
2024/03/27
20:16 UTC

1,169

Deposition of copper onto steel! Credit: Techience

42 Comments
2024/03/11
16:25 UTC

113

Luminol chemoluminescence

0 Comments
2024/02/28
16:19 UTC

282

Thermite

11 Comments
2024/02/27
03:41 UTC

1,010

Calcium Gluconate Pill Snakes Grow When Heated

37 Comments
2024/02/26
23:12 UTC

569

Al+I2——>AlI3

39 Comments
2024/02/26
05:07 UTC

27

Potassium hexathiocyanochromate(III) synthesis

5 Comments
2024/02/25
20:33 UTC

3,943

Aluminum vs Mercury. Who will win?!?

152 Comments
2024/02/25
13:01 UTC

208

Thermite reaction turning out to be more violent than expected

36 Comments
2024/02/08
17:18 UTC

1,334

Iodine clock reaction demonstration I did for my chemistry students

60 Comments
2024/01/15
15:03 UTC

356

Freezing Liquid Nitrogen

7 Comments
2024/01/02
17:28 UTC

156

fake cut with a chemical reaction

16 Comments
2023/12/30
22:11 UTC

52

Merry Chrismas tree (type 2)

2 Comments
2023/12/30
13:35 UTC

107

Silver Merry Chrismas tree (type 1)

3 Comments
2023/12/30
13:33 UTC

394

Merry Chemis'tree'

7 Comments
2023/12/25
18:11 UTC

314

Сatalytic oxidation of acetone with copper dendrite

7 Comments
2023/12/22
09:46 UTC

788

Cleaning the rotavap

57 Comments
2023/12/11
19:48 UTC

490

Iodine reaction - Credit: Techience

24 Comments
2023/11/21
20:47 UTC

381

Solvation of sodium metal in anhydrous ammonia affords complex electrically conductive solution of the electride salt [Na(NH3)6]+e-. Over time, electrons slowly reduce this complex to yield NaNH2 and hydrogen gas. More info in post description.

Na + 6 NH3 → [Na(NH3)6]+e−

2 [Na(NH3)6]+e− → H2 + 2 NaNH2 + 10 NH3

Aside from the redox reaction of the coordination complex being reduced by electrons to yield NaNH2 and hydrogen, something even weirder is taking place here.

In this clip the solution is sufficiently concentrated (>3M) with added Na that a transition from the characteristic blue color of low-energy bound-state solvated electrons to an even more exotic bronze-colored state can be observed.

It is hypothesized that this state is effectively the result of the decreasing stability of low-concentration bound states as the concentration of electrons increases. The resulting transition is very peculiar indeed.

In essence, there is only so much space which allows for the existence of bound states (wherein the free electron polarizes the surrounding solvent such that it is contained in a so-called "bound state") because these bound states occupy a cavity of relatively large volume in the solvent. As more metal is added, more electrons are free in the solution, but the solution is already saturated with these bound electrons. Thus, the electrostatic and exclusion effects become such that any additional electrons added can only exist in a metallic state.

This is peculiar because this metallic state is in the liquid phase and is quite dense. If one continues adding electrons, they always become incorporated into the metallic state because the bound states are saturated. Measuring the electrical conductivity of a solution of sodium in ammonia as a function of concentration supports this conjecture, as the conductivity increases linearly as a function of concentration until it suddenly hits a plateau and doesn't increase any further. This plateau represents the point at which enough electrons are present that the destabilizing effects due the presence of other electrons is large enough that no possible bound state can exist and the whole system becomes metallic.

33 Comments
2023/10/30
05:13 UTC

349

Camphor crystalisation

6 Comments
2023/10/24
14:59 UTC

334

Cavitation in a bottle at 82000 fps.

15 Comments
2023/10/21
14:26 UTC

1,142

Bromine and Aluminum Fireworks

20 Comments
2023/10/16
00:19 UTC

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