/r/Renewable

Photograph via snooOG

Renewable: Any and all discussion about renewable technologies and trends for the future and the now.

Energy, environment, economics, greenwashing, research, depopulation, peak oil, biofuels, wind, solar, geothermal, fusion, hydro - you name it.

Unrestricted discussion of whether all of those even fit in here!


Related Subreddits
/r/RenewableEnergy /r/Solar
/r/Energy /r/Biomass
/r/Wind /r/Solar
/r/Green /r/Permaculture
/r/Environment /r/Futurology
/r/Askscience /r/Climate

/r/Renewable

18,737 Subscribers

1

Simulation: The fusion of Information Technology with Physical Science and Engineering

0 Comments
2024/06/23
15:59 UTC

7

Like the US, Canada now has an Investment Tax Credit (ITC) for solar, as Bill C-59 passes

The passage of Bill C-59 finally introduces the long-awaited Clean Technology Investment Tax Credit, offering a 20—to 30-percent refundable tax credit for investments in wind, solar, and energy storage projects.

This crucial legislation positions Canada as a global renewable energy market leader, supporting its economic and environmental goals through 2034.

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You can find a link to the report in the comments below.

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1 Comment
2024/06/20
12:38 UTC

1

Countries for a Career in Renewables?

Hi, I'm from Austria and starting my master's in renewables. I want to travel and work abroad. Even working with other countries in a global setting would be nice...language recommendation there? (aside from English and German)

Any recommendations for countries with a good standard of living and job opportunities in renewables?I don't worry about the language barrier. I'm confident I can learn the local language and culture quickly.

0 Comments
2024/06/19
22:14 UTC

31

New report debunks 33 misconceptions about solar, wind, and electric vehicles

Misinformation and coordinated disinformation about renewable energy are widespread and threaten to undermine the clean energy transition.

In this report, the Earth Institute at Columbia University identifies and examines 33 of the most pervasive false claims about solar energy, wind energy, and electric vehicles to promote a more informed discussion.

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You can find a link to the report in the comments below.

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If you found this helpful, please consider sharing it with your connections and following us for similar updates. 👍🏽

5 Comments
2024/06/19
11:24 UTC

3 Comments
2024/06/18
16:28 UTC

2

Dissertation help

Hi all,

I know this isn't the usual post about renewable energy here on this subreddit but am currently looking for some help. I am a student studying renewable energy engineering and at the moment our class is at the stage where we are choosing our dissertation topics for our undergraduate degrees. I have had a few ideas but I am quite unsure of them all. I know I would like to do something in the battery storage field but really will take any ideas. Thanks for your help :)

3 Comments
2024/06/17
22:47 UTC

9

World’s 1st Commercial Aircraft Using 100% Sustainable Aviation Fuel

The world’s first in-flight study using 100% sustainable aviation fuel (SAF) in a commercial aircraft has demonstrated significant reductions in non-CO2 emissions. Conducted by AirbusRolls-Royce, the German Aerospace Center (DLR), and SAF producer Neste, the study involved an Airbus A350 powered by Rolls-Royce Trent XWB engines.

Hi, I usually cover topics like this in weekly newsletter (completely free), you can check it out here, back to the topic below.

The results showed a 56% reduction in soot particle emissions and contrail ice crystal formation compared to conventional Jet A-1 fuel, which could substantially decrease the climate-warming effects of condensation trails, known as contrails.

DLR’s global climate model simulations indicate that using 100% SAF could reduce the climate impact of contrails by 26%. This reduction in radiative forcing highlights SAF’s potential to mitigate aviation’s environmental impact beyond just CO2 emissions.

Traditional jet fuels contribute to greenhouse gas emissions and contrails, exacerbating global warming. The ECLIF3 study shows that SAF can play a critical role in the sector's journey towards net-zero emissions, addressing both CO2 and non-CO2 effects.

0 Comments
2024/06/13
15:12 UTC

20

What is everyones view on this?

4 Comments
2024/06/08
18:17 UTC

13

We don't need all that much land for clean electricity - examples for Germany and the UK

1 Comment
2024/06/05
11:49 UTC

6

U.S. finds the golden hydrogen in this region: trillions of dollars of this futuristic energy here

5 Comments
2024/06/03
04:06 UTC

4

A calculation of roughly 83kW net gain of energy

1 Comment
2024/06/02
10:44 UTC

2

Urge Congress to Regulate Crypto and Crypto Mining in the U.S.

0 Comments
2024/05/25
16:04 UTC

4

Urge Congress to Regulate Crypto and Crypto Mining in the U.S.

0 Comments
2024/05/25
16:01 UTC

5

Street / Building Layout and total emissions - thoughts on this

So, I've been thinking all morning - we all know that the suburban sprawl is a contributor to the GHG emissions, but is there more to it?

Namely, we usually think that living in green, sparsely populated areas, such as the suburbs, is simply a greener way of living. Some may have a small veggie patch, the air is cleaner, and the overall greenery around is beneficial to one's health. However, if we follow the carbon emissions per capita, we can see that people living in cities have way lower emissions than those living in the suburbs.

Why? Well, when living in a city, everything is close by and many choose not to start their cars for every little shopping need they have. In most cases, the amenities/shops/services you need are all within a walking distance. On the other hand, the more rural the area you live in, the more miles you have to put into any activity you have - going to work - 30 minutes' ride. Going to the NEARBY supermarket - 20 minutes behind the wheel. Taking kids to their soccer practice - 15-30 minutes ride away. When it comes to living in areas that are not densely-populated, even the smallest activities release some carbon.

On top of this, it is useful to take some more measurements into account. For every family that lives in the suburbs, more road needs to be constructed, more trees cut and more piping needs to be laid down. When it comes to these works - they release a lot of CO2 as well. Add to this more electricity being used to keep the lights on the streets on and also consider all the cables and power poles and how much CO2 setting up each of them takes up. On the other hand, suburban homes are carbon sinks of a kind - as the wood traditionally used in constructing them stores some CO2.

So, the story is more complex than the simple flowerbed in front of a beautiful suburban home. I would argue that the best way to fix the suburbs would be rezoning them - and turning them into something similar to the European concept of 10 or 15-minute cities.

By default, these cities are simply areas within existing cities where most of your daily needs can be finished within 10-15 minutes of your home. And on foot for that matter. The local store, municipality office, school and high school, the local barber, bar, restaurant, fast food, car mechanic, and many more services are accessible on foot. With this in mind, dedicating a connected space to the idea and to the services could significantly reduce the suburban CO2 emissions. On top of this, it would also keep people more in shape, as starting the car in most European neighborhoods is not an everyday thing - I am not sure if this is simply a habit or a design solution - but it works.

What are your thoughts on this? What would you do differently in your suburban area, i.e. what ideas do you have that could help you reduce your personal CO2 that may not be talked about very often?

0 Comments
2024/05/23
12:16 UTC

1

Online masters in energy systems engineering

Does anyone know the best online programs for advanced energy engineering / renewable engineering / energy systems in the US? I am currently seeing University of Michigan and University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign energy systems engineering programs as the only options.

I have a bachelors in mechanical engineering and am currently working in the renewable energy field, so I am looking for something that is more technical and can bridge my gap between mechanical and electrical engineering knowledge.

1 Comment
2024/05/08
11:28 UTC

18

Solar ahead and increasing the lead. Now that it's available in discount supermarkets with batteries and EV chargers, it's scaling like nothing else.

5 Comments
2024/05/08
08:40 UTC

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