/r/botany

Photograph via snooOG

Botany is the scientific study of plants. Topics may include: Evolution, Ecology, Morphology, Systematics, and Physiology.

Please use r/whatsthisplant for all plant identification requests.

If you have any questions or want to discuss the science of botany, please feel free to post a question or discussion topic.


If you need a plant ID'd, please head to /r/whatsthisplant

If you need help taking care of a plant please go to /r/plantclinic

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Assessing botanical capacity report

Online botanical resources

/r/botany

156,102 Subscribers

1

Catalpa growth rate?

Howdy, we have a mature northern catalpa tree on my in laws property, and there’s a lot of sentimental value to it. I’m trying to gauge the age of it, and I know the circumference at 4.5 feet is 168 inches. Would anyone happen to know what the growth factor would be for that species? Thanks!!

2 Comments
2024/05/05
21:43 UTC

2

Are Western Hemlock seeds poisonous or harmful?

I know western hemlock is unrelated to poisonous hemlock, and the plant itself is harmless, but I want to find out if the seeds are harmless too - can’t seem to find out on general websites and don’t know where to look for technical information like that. Any pointers welcome.

4 Comments
2024/05/05
18:21 UTC

1

Started Botany- Are there any books that describe its history with the reasons for the classifications?

Or just some really good diagrams in general would help loads, thanks!

0 Comments
2024/05/05
04:06 UTC

293

Pass judgement on this botany sweatshirt

Found this sweatshirt at the thrift store and am wondering how accurate it actually is. I'm not a botanist by any means, so I wanted to see if y'all can spot anything amiss that I might miss.

This is what I've managed to catch:

-Capitalizing the M in "Amanita Muscaria" (I think species names are supposed to be lowercase if I remember correctly)

-Use of taxonomy names vs. common names is inconsistent

-Level of taxonomical (is that a word?) identification is inconsistent (ex. Amanita muscaria and Crocus speciosus are identified at species level while Clover and Lavender are only identified at the genus level)

-The plant with the big root and orange flowers(?) in the middle is not identified (does anyone know what that is?)

Is there anything I missed that y'all can think of? I don't know plants well enough to judge the accuracy of the illustrations.

And would you judge someone for wearing this sweatshirt if they're not a bontanist? I've never studied botany and only recently got into gardening so I don't know a ton about plants. I'm worried I'll either be laughed at or spontaneously quizzed on plant facts if I wear this thing out in public so I'm debating whether I should return it. But maybe I'm just being paranoid.

(Also apologies for weird formatting - I'm on mobile)

34 Comments
2024/05/05
02:27 UTC

7

Spots on Arbutus unedo leaves I collected a week ago for an herbarium

One of my assignments for my botany course is to collect plants to produce a herbarium, and one of the required plants is the Chorleywood. I was wondering what these spots on the leaves are. Any help? Thanks!

3 Comments
2024/05/04
22:30 UTC

6

What book would you recommend for a beginner?

I am looking for a book or guide containing basic info about different plants and their uses, which ones are poisonous and so on. I basically would like a beginner's guide. What would you recommend?

PS. I didn't find a better tag.

5 Comments
2024/05/04
16:22 UTC

3

Photoperiod plant question

Suppose I have a plant that flowers when the dark period is a certain length. If in summer, I cover a branch in light-blocking material, and illuminate it weakly with some LEDs at a 12/12 light cycle (just enough lighting to signal the plant to keep the branch alive), could I get it to flower and produce fruit?

Would the photosynthesis from the uncovered branches delivery nutrients to the covered branch?

9 Comments
2024/05/03
15:11 UTC

1

Questions about poison oak and dogs?

I'm currently on a hike with a fuck ton of poison oak. I'm nervous about it hurting my dog so I'm keeping her in a heel the whole time and have to remain super vigilant, which isn't fun for either of us. Will it seriously harm her? One article I read said take dogs to the vet immediately but I know the Internet is full of misinformation. Or can I be a little more relaxed as long as she doesn't eat any? I'm wearing pants and boots so I'm not super concerned about me.

Thanks!

3 Comments
2024/05/02
21:14 UTC

4

Oxalic traingularis subterranean structure

I'm doing a research project on Oxalis triangularis. I'm finding conflicting information online about what the tuber-like structure is. Is it a tuber? Rhizome? Bulb?

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/236694370_Synthetic_Seeds_Production_and_Regeneration_of_Oxalis_triangularis_for_Mass_Propagation_and_Conservation

I also read here that Oxalis triangularis doesn't naturally produce viable seeds, is this true? Isn't that a key characteristic of angiosperms? If it solely relies on the subterranean structure to reproduce asexually, then what is the point of the flowers?

Thanks in advance

0 Comments
2024/05/02
01:07 UTC

5

I wrote a technical article on microgreen lighting with theory and links to the peer reviewed literature

https://www.reddit.com/r/HandsOnComplexity/comments/1ci0l9c/technical_aspects_of_microgreen_lighting/?

With plants most people don't mention the role of acid growth and I get into why that's important with microgreens.

I have a shot of my spectroradiometer showing chlorophyll fluorescence which is how I can measure photosynthesis efficiency. I show my little light profiling setup using 6 two gallon buckets as grow chambers

At the bottom are some useful notes and links to about 30 peer reviewed papers. The peer reviewed literature for a range of plants is showing that far red light may actually reduce yields which is the opposite of what has been though for decades.

I make an argument of why one might want to experiment using lower color temperature lights rather than the more common 6500K lights with microgreens.

0 Comments
2024/05/01
23:40 UTC

5

Canvas field press

Looks like the Forestry Suppliers and Herbarium Supply are on back order or out of stock for the canvas field press, does anyone know another place to get one? TIA I’m in the USA.

0 Comments
2024/05/01
16:45 UTC

8

Tulips that smell like fish

This isn't a plant identification request / care help, but rather an unusual observation, so I hope it is OK to post my question here.

I was recently gifted 3 bunches of different tulips. When they started to die, one bunch (pink tulips with white fluffy edges) started to smell like FISH / rotting fish. I buy / get flowers regularly and never noticed such smell before. It was strong and disgusting. I thought it's just this variety of flowers.

I shared this with my friend in another country, and she said that she recently bought a bunch of carnation flowers and they also started to smell like fish! So it isn't just tulips.

What could be causing flowers to have this unusual unplesant smell?

1 Comment
2024/05/01
14:56 UTC

5

Questions about "Water ascent in trees and lianas: the cohesion-tension theory revisited in the wake of Otto Renner" by Friedrich-Wilhelm Bentrup

An old comment in another stub pointed to this paper and I was really surprised by the fact that we seemingly don't have a clear understanding of something as basic as how plants get their water (especially since my high school and non-botany undergraduate education suggested that this was a long-solved problem.)

I'd really love to learn more about where the state of the art is today.

FWIW, I asked Google Gemini to summarize the article for me to see if I was reading it correctly and this is what it gave me:

This paper challenges the cohesion-tension theory (C-T), which states that water rises in plants through tension created by transpiration. The author argues that several recent studies have shown that the C-T theory is not entirely accurate.

New techniques, such as pressure probes and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, have allowed scientists to measure water movement in plants more accurately. These studies have shown that water can move uphill against gravity through mechanisms other than tension, such as osmosis and capillary action.

The author also criticizes the Scholander bomb, a tool traditionally used to measure water tension in plants. The author argues that this tool is not very accurate and does not provide reliable data.

Overall, the paper suggests that the C-T theory is incomplete and that there are other mechanisms at play in the movement of water in plants.

4 Comments
2024/05/01
03:20 UTC

4

A question about mint plant flavor

Is there any way to make a genetically modified mint plant in which it's flavor comes from seeds instead of it's leaves, so that it can last much longer with almost a 100% the same flavor as the mint fresh leaves in there peak quality and flavor? I am thinking about this, because seeds don't get rotten quickly like fresh leaves, and I don't like the flavor of dry minte leaves.

1 Comment
2024/04/30
22:50 UTC

0

Question for a dying plant

Do plants continue to grow as they are dying or do they stop growth and slowly die from the bottom and up?

3 Comments
2024/04/30
21:46 UTC

97

Fused trees

This pair is a shortleaf pine and a black gum that seem to have grown into each other and have possibly fused.

Is it possible for such vastly different trees to interconnect and share nutrients with each other?

16 Comments
2024/04/30
19:23 UTC

3

Do you know some game to learn family and spec of dirmcferent kind of plants ?

I search game like flashcard to learn family and spécifications (ways of farming) of differents plants : vegetables, ornementales plants, etc.

1 Comment
2024/04/30
13:59 UTC

9

Why would plants of the same species have larger leaves on average in coastal populations than that of mountain based ones?

Hey there, I've been writing a paper (in my own time for practice) on the differing trait sizes of the same species across 2 environmental gradients. These gradients are uk based coastal and mountain, with the plant being silene uniflora. I'm touching upon plasticity in this paper as well as gene variation, with the main thing I've been comparing being leaves. Anyways, here's the question, why would coastal leaves be longer, wider and thicker on average? You see I did this study assuming it would be the other way round, and now I'm mega confused as my results from data collection have shown a significant difference to saying other wise. Any answers would be great and I'd really appreciate the help! Even theories would be nice, or links to papers! I know this is a big ask but I appreciate all the help I get!

13 Comments
2024/04/30
10:17 UTC

16

Spam Bots - Please report

There have been spam bots (GPT bots) sprawling our subreddit and leaving spammy comments. If you see any comment that might have been made by a spam bot, please report it so we can take action against the bot.

4 Comments
2024/04/30
00:29 UTC

4

How does a botanist decide if a plant is a distinct species or a subspecies? Curious about Camellia spp.

Context: I tried to learn about C. Dehongensis and ended up with a bunch of loose ends. What does a first publication (for the author citation) typically look like in botany? A single paper or a reference book? How do you find and interpret first pubs in other languages? If you're investigating a species of interest, do you read the oldest literature on it or the newest?

0 Comments
2024/04/29
21:14 UTC

0

Pictures of euphorbia platyclada in the wild?

Do you know of any?

2 Comments
2024/04/29
17:39 UTC

2

What are the simplest plants?

Just stumbled upon this thought while staring at my wilting succulent: what are the simplest plants out there? You know, the ones that even I can't kill within a week? I'm talking about those green buddies that thrive on neglect, minimal water, and maybe a bit of sunlight peeking through the curtains every now and then.

I'm not exactly known for having a green thumb (more like a black thumb, if we're being real), but I still want some greenery in my life without feeling like I'm running a botanical garden. So, hit me with your suggestions, folks! Bonus points if they're cute, low-maintenance, and can survive a forgetful plant parent like me.

And hey, if you've got any hilarious stories about your own plant parenting fails or successes, I'm all ears. Let's turn this into a wholesome plant therapy session where we laugh, cry, and maybe learn a thing or two about keeping our leafy pals alive.

2 Comments
2024/04/29
02:55 UTC

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