/r/history

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/r/History is a place for discussions about history. Feel free to submit interesting articles, tell us about this cool book you just read, or start a discussion about who everyone's favorite figure of minor French nobility is!


This is a somewhat more serious subreddit compared to many others. Make sure to familiarize yourself with our rules and guidelines before participating. Thanks!

 

Join the r/history Discord server to chat with other history enthusiast!

/r/History moderator applications

 

Join the /r/History Discord server!

/r/History is a place for discussions about history. Feel free to submit interesting articles, tell us about this cool book you just read, or start a discussion about who everyone's favorite figure of minor French nobility is!

 

Help! My post is not visible?!
All posts will be reviewed by a human moderator first before they become visible to all subscribers on the subreddit. So it is perfectly normally for your post to not show up in the new listing. If a post breaks one of our rules or guidelines you will be informed about it.

 

/r/History moderator applications

 

/r/History introduction

Rules

  1. Keep it civil!
  2. No current politics or soapboxing.
  3. No historical negationism or denialism
  4. Comments should be on-topic and contribute.
  5. Discussions are limited to events over 20 years ago.

View all 13 rules in detail...

Guidelines

  1. Use that report button!
  2. Avoid reposts.
  3. Don't spam your personal website.

View all 5 guidelines in detail...

 

The /r/History Wiki Pages

Our read, listen & watch list

Join the /r/History Discord server!

Contact the /r/History moderators

/r/History moderator applications

 

Upcoming history related AMAs

Guest Date Time

Want to do an AMA or know someone who does? Message the mods!

Instructions and advice on how to best do an AMA.

Previous AMAs done in /r/History.

 

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/r/history

18,071,006 Subscribers

2

Bookclub and Sources Wednesday!

Hi everybody,

Welcome to our weekly book recommendation thread!

We have found that a lot of people come to this sub to ask for books about history or sources on certain topics. Others make posts about a book they themselves have read and want to share their thoughts about it with the rest of the sub.

We thought it would be a good idea to try and bundle these posts together a bit. One big weekly post where everybody can ask for books or (re)sources on any historic subject or timeperiod, or to share books they recently discovered or read. Giving opinions or asking about their factuality is encouraged!

Of course it’s not limited to *just* books; podcasts, videos, etc. are also welcome. As a reminder, r/history also has a recommended list of things to read, listen to or watch

7 Comments
2024/06/19
11:00 UTC

0

Medievalist Professor Answers Medieval Questions From The Internet

5 Comments
2024/06/19
09:03 UTC

0

If Vlad Tepes in history was Christian and "Dracul" means Son of the Devil why did he use it?

Vlad Tepes, also known as Vlad the Impaler, was a Christian Orthodox warrior renowned for his fierce defense of Wallachia against Ottoman incursions in the 15th century. He is often associated with the Order of the Dragon, a chivalric order founded to defend Christianity in Eastern Europe. The name "Dracula" has its roots in this association.

The term "Dracula" is derived from the Latin word "draco," meaning "dragon." Vlad's father, Vlad II, was inducted into the Order of the Dragon in 1431, earning him the moniker "Vlad Dracul," or "Vlad the Dragon." As a result, Vlad III, his son, adopted the surname "Dracula," meaning "son of the dragon" or "son of Dracul" .

The Order of the Dragon was dedicated to halting the advance of the Ottoman Empire, and its members pledged to defend Christianity against its enemies. Vlad III's adoption of the name "Dracula" was a reflection of his father's legacy and his own commitment to this cause. The name symbolized not only his lineage but also his allegiance to the Order's mission.

However, the name "Dracula" has since been intertwined with a more sinister connotation, largely due to Bram Stoker's 1897 novel "Dracula," which fictionalized Vlad as a vampire count. Despite this literary association, the historical Vlad Tepes bore the name "Dracula" as a proud emblem of his heritage and his role as a staunch defender of Christian Europe .

Sources:

  1. Treptow, Kurt W. "Vlad III Dracula: The Life and Times of the Historical Dracula." Center for Romanian Studies, 2000.
  2. Florescu, Radu R., and Raymond T. McNally. "Dracula: Prince of Many Faces." Little, Brown and Company, 1989.
  3. Trow, M. J. "Vlad the Impaler: In Search of the Real Dracula." The History Press, 2003.
31 Comments
2024/06/15
23:58 UTC

10

Weekly History Questions Thread.

Welcome to our History Questions Thread!

This thread is for all those history related questions that are too simple, short or a bit too silly to warrant their own post.

So, do you have a question about history and have always been afraid to ask? Well, today is your lucky day. Ask away!

Of course all our regular rules and guidelines still apply and to be just that bit extra clear:

Questions need to be historical in nature. Silly does not mean that your question should be a joke. r/history also has an active discord server where you can discuss history with other enthusiasts and experts.

22 Comments
2024/06/15
12:00 UTC

8

HUNT FOR HISTORY: Metal Detecting Hungary

0 Comments
2024/06/12
20:51 UTC

19

Bookclub and Sources Wednesday!

Hi everybody,

Welcome to our weekly book recommendation thread!

We have found that a lot of people come to this sub to ask for books about history or sources on certain topics. Others make posts about a book they themselves have read and want to share their thoughts about it with the rest of the sub.

We thought it would be a good idea to try and bundle these posts together a bit. One big weekly post where everybody can ask for books or (re)sources on any historic subject or timeperiod, or to share books they recently discovered or read. Giving opinions or asking about their factuality is encouraged!

Of course it’s not limited to *just* books; podcasts, videos, etc. are also welcome. As a reminder, r/history also has a recommended list of things to read, listen to or watch

13 Comments
2024/06/12
11:00 UTC

7

Weekly History Questions Thread.

Welcome to our History Questions Thread!

This thread is for all those history related questions that are too simple, short or a bit too silly to warrant their own post.

So, do you have a question about history and have always been afraid to ask? Well, today is your lucky day. Ask away!

Of course all our regular rules and guidelines still apply and to be just that bit extra clear:

Questions need to be historical in nature. Silly does not mean that your question should be a joke. r/history also has an active discord server where you can discuss history with other enthusiasts and experts.

51 Comments
2024/06/08
12:00 UTC

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