/r/geology

Photograph via snooOG

The scientific study of the origin, history, and structure of the Earth.

The scientific study of the origin, history, and structure of the Earth.

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/r/geology

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2

Earthquake early warning

For the first time ever I received an early warning alert about an earthquake. My TV was on and the Emergency Broadcast System, the same one that’s been annoying me with tests my whole life, sounded. It said there was an earthquake imminent.

There was enough time to react, although I just stayed laying in bed and a fair amount of shaking commenced shortly after. I am so thrilled and amazed to experience this, I figured it only proper to stop by and thank a geologist for the fun.

Whatever any scientist of any kind does, thank you for carrying mankind forward while so many are trying to pull us back. You people rock!

0 Comments
2024/02/12
10:43 UTC

6

Photo of the San Andreas Fault showcasing rocks from the Pacific Plate (gray rocks) and the North American Plate (tan rocks). Rare sight of two plates contacting like this

2 Comments
2024/02/12
09:16 UTC

13

Sand grains in a spider head?!

Just over 3mm FOV

Sand grains from near Bandon,OR, piled into the empty molted headcap of a jumping spider (turned upside down like a bowl). You can see them through the clear eye lenses (Jumping spider shed their exoskeleton like snakes or other insects as they grow. The head cap piece comes off in one piece like a bowl)

1 Comment
2024/02/12
01:50 UTC

22

where entrada meets carmel sandstone: double arch

0 Comments
2024/02/12
00:00 UTC

1

Thinking about changing careers.. need advice

I've been an x-ray tech forever but the pandemic pretty much ruined me wanting to work medical anymore. I went back to school and got an AS in computer Information Technology and then a BS in cybersecurity. WELL come to find out it is pretty much impossible to actually get a cybersecurity job. I would have to do help desk for a few years first which pays nothing and I currently make 30+ an hour in Radiology. So im thinking about going back to school again. I don't want my 3 years of IT school to go to waste so I'm looking for recommendations for fields that would possibly combine geology and IT? I love science and nature and have always been drawn to geology related things. Any advice or recommendations would be appreciated.

5 Comments
2024/02/11
23:43 UTC

30

Serpentine!

Check out this cool piece serpentine we found!

0 Comments
2024/02/11
22:23 UTC

11

Serpentine!

Check out this cool piece serpentine we found!

4 Comments
2024/02/11
22:23 UTC

14

Un known rock! Need an expert help! My grade 12 son/student bring home this heavy magnetic crystalize and metalic rock! Thanks

3 Comments
2024/02/11
22:14 UTC

5

Are there Australia specific rocks?

My niece just got a rock tumbler and is loving it and I'd like to get her some interesting rocks to polish. So my question is are there any rocks I could get her that only form in Australia? I think she'd get a kick out of looking up those places on the map, and finding out why they only form in spot X.

Apologies for the train wreck of a request.

15 Comments
2024/02/11
20:32 UTC

23

Sand from near Bandon, Oregon

Jar is 12mm tall

0 Comments
2024/02/11
20:10 UTC

3

Does fossil cliff in Pennsylvania ever close?

I’m not from the area, but was interested in checking it out. I know some geologic sites close seasonally so I furthered I check before driving there.

0 Comments
2024/02/11
18:46 UTC

0

Career title questions geological survey?

So I stayed at an Airbnb a while ago and came across this couple next door and they said they did geological survey and that they were working there. They also said it was a sweet gig since they had their Airbnb paid for for 6 months. What kind of career is this if i may ask? Is it realistic to find that kind of work where the location is paid for like that? Is it a local thing or a governmental thing? Thank you in advance for your advice and help!

1 Comment
2024/02/11
18:30 UTC

48

Two balanced sand grains

Both from Bandon, Oregon 1mm FOV

2 Comments
2024/02/11
17:36 UTC

30

Do geologist have good work/life balance

I understand that geologist may have to do long hours for field work and im willing to do this because I enjoy field work to an extent, but will these long hours be consistent or will they only be occasional? I want to be able to have a career where i can still have a social life and family.

32 Comments
2024/02/11
16:57 UTC

253

Exposed rock in an abandoned railroad tunnel in Minnesota

13 Comments
2024/02/11
16:55 UTC

2

recommendations?

What is everyone's favourite Geology related movies? Fictional, true stories, etc.

3 Comments
2024/02/11
12:44 UTC

13

Graduate program in Earth Sciences...is it too late for me?

Hey everyone, I have a Bachelor's in Petroleum Engineering and I've been working as a Reservoir engineer for ExxonMobil in India for the last 5 years. There's a ceiling in terms of challenging technical work and I've reached it, all opportunities beyond this are managerial (I'm not interested in that). I have personal reasons as well to think of emigration.

From the limited experience that I've had from geology courses as part of my undergrad, some basic geology field trips and interacting with Geologists/Geoscientists in my job, I find it extremely fascinating. At this point in my life/career, if I'm going to leave my job and my country, I would want to do that for "Tier 1" programs.

I've had the fortune of travelling to USA, if given a choice I'd prefer Western Europe maybe because of ideological similarities but it's not a strong no for USA.

I'm 26, if I apply this year for Fall courses next year, I'll be almost 28 when I actually start. Is that a concern? Should I be worried about "younger" people getting more opportunities or is it mostly merit-based? Little research shows me that ETH and Harvard should be my aspirational goals.

Thoughts? Sorry it's not a very structured post but I'm just looking for holes in this plan and any...any insights that you might have. Thank you for reading.

Edit: In the last 5 years, I've worked on areas in the Permian Basin..tight sands and shales.

38 Comments
2024/02/11
09:13 UTC

0

Future proof research topic

Which fields are promising for employment in the future for someone who want to study Earth sciences? Although I am interested in glaciology, I won't take a chance on research that won't be worthwhile in the near future. Please let me know

5 Comments
2024/02/11
06:04 UTC

17

Mineragraphy - use now

Hello colleagues!

I study ore minerals using optical methods. I identify ore associations and conduct textural and structural analysis. At the same time, I teach mineragraphy to students.

Are there any economics/exploration geologists here? How often do you use mineragraphy for exploration work? I think most geologists now primarily use chemical analysis for exploration. Is it so? What do you think?

Are there any geology students here? I’m trying to make a tutorial on mineragraphy as a telegram channel with a lot of graphic materials. Do you think this will help you with your studies?

https://preview.redd.it/9wvhopd2wthc1.jpg?width=3396&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=a589c1bbd75aa7e8579ef528a3a0bb867bf2ea4d

https://preview.redd.it/924dr9y6wthc1.jpg?width=3396&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=b223a12ed0dd689863d469e4187560f9f7b6c50e

9 Comments
2024/02/10
21:49 UTC

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